Category Archives: Fiction

dial meow for murder

Review: Dial Meow for Murder by Bethany Blake

Daphne and Socrates are back for another fun mystery in Bethany Blake’s second Lucky Paws Petsitting Mystery series, Dial Meow for Murder. Some of you may remember how much I loved the first book, Death by Chocolate LabNeedless to say, I was not-so-patiently waiting for the next one. I needed to know what happened to the Rotties!

Speaking of, while I did find out what happened to them, it was a two-sentence-in-passing mention. Please write another book about the Rotties, Ms. Blake.

I wasn’t quite as enamored with Dial Meow for Murder as I was with Chocolate Lab. Oh, I still enjoyed it, and I still plan on continuing the series. But a lot of what was so great about the first book was all the animals, and that just felt like it was missing here. Even Socrates didn’t have much of a role. Plus, I wanted Artie back.

I do think Blake improved on the mystery, keeping it front and center for the majority of the story. Daphne was also a little more subdued, but truthfully, I missed her passion from the first book. We did get more information about Detective Black’s past, and some more about Sylvan Creek, both of which I wanted in the first book. So, happy there!

Dial Meow for Murder is still a great cozy, and I can’t wait to see what happens in book 3!

Series: Lucky Paws Petsitting Mystery #2    Paperback: 328 pages

Published: September 2017 by Kensington    Source: Netgalley

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Dial Meow for Murder on Goodreads

Even an experienced pet sitter like Daphne Templeton can be fooled by animal behavior: how can an adorably tiny fuzz ball named Tinkleston be capable of sudden flying leaps with cat claws bared? But human behavior remains even more mysterious, especially when Tinkleston s owner is murdered on the night of a gala fundraiser for Fur-ever Friends Pet Rescue.

Accompanied by her unflappable basset hound, Socrates, Daphne plans to take charge of Tinks the Terror and leave the crime-solving to handsome detective Jonathan Black. But while luring the prickly Persian out of hiding, she uncovers clues that might take suspicion off her own mother. Maeve Templeton already has a reputation as a killer in real estate. How far would she go to bag Sylvan Creek s most coveted property, the Flynt Mansion?

To expose the truth, Daphne finds herself donning a deranged clown costume on an autumnal adventure that might just be crazy enough to work if it doesn t get her killed. Includes recipes for homemade pet treats!

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americanwar

Review: American War by Omar El Akkad

American War. What do I even begin to tell you about this book? I finished it weeks ago and I’m still thinking about it. I totally understand why it was nominated for two Goodreads Choice Awards (and yes, I voted for it).

American War is one of those wonderful books that both entertains and makes you think. It follows Sara T. Chestnut, known as Sarat, as she navigates the horrors of life during the second American Civil War. As you read (or in my case, listen), you begin to realize that what the author describes isn’t that far-fetched after all. A country where North and South are at odds over resources and politics? Where red and blue become more than just an association – they become an identity? Where people turn on each other, torture each other, and hate each other?

Not so hard to imagine, is it?

Perhaps this is what makes American War so compelling, or perhaps it’s Sarat herself. This fierce, defiant, and eternally loyal little girl who grows up to become one of the most influential and terrible people in the war. And yet, for all her faults, you can’t help but empathize with Sarat. Her experiences as a child make her who she is as an adult – hard, but haunted. There’s a humanity and tenderness in her, that you wish for throughout the whole story, but only glimpse at times. Sarat is one of the most complex characters I’ve read in a long time.

American War isn’t perfect, and the lack of exposition for the war itself is most of what kept me from giving this one 5 stars. I’d rank it behind both Station Eleven and The Road, though the feel is similar. It’s an entirely plausible dystopian novel, both timely and tragic. Well worth the read.

Hardcover: 352 pages    Audio: 12 hours

Published: April 2017 by Knopf Publishing Group    Source: Purchased via Scribd

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American War on Goodreads

Sarat Chestnut, born in Louisiana, is only six when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. But even she knows that oil is outlawed, that Louisiana is half underwater, that unmanned drones fill the sky. And when her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she quickly begins to be shaped by her particular time and place until, finally, through the influence of a mysterious functionary, she is turned into a deadly instrument of war. Telling her story is her nephew, Benjamin Chestnut, born during war – part of the Miraculous Generation – now an old man confronting the dark secret of his past, his family’s role in the conflict and, in particular, that of his aunt, a woman who saved his life while destroying untold others.

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dogdishofdoom

Review: Dog Dish of Doom by E.J. Copperman

I know none of you are surprised to see that I read a book with a dog on the cover. If there’s one thing that gets me every.single.time, it’s dogs. I don’t care what the book is about, if there’s a dog in the description or on the cover, I’m going to read it. (Might just take me a while!)

Dog Dish of Doom is the first in a new cozy series from E.J. Copperman (pen name for the writer Jeff Cohen). Copperman/Cohen is no stranger to cozies – from what I can gather, Agent to the Paws is his 4th cozy series. The main character, Kay, is a showbiz agent for animals. Sounds like a fun gig, if we’re honest.

I kinda hated, Kay, truthfully. She annoyed the crap out of me, and I thought she was a bad sleuth. Part of it might have been the fact that she seemed utterly uninterested in solving the murder. Part of it might have been that she was so BAD at what she was trying to figure out. Honestly, I liked her parents more than I liked Kay. I also wanted more Bruno, but that’s kinda beside the point.

Dog Dish of Doom was a relatively short read, but also kind of a boring one. Not much happened, and as I said, there was very little sleuthing. I also got tired of reading the same phrases over and over again.

The more I think about it, the more I want to downgrade my rating to a 2. It’s probably more like 2.5, because I didn’t hate it, but I also have no desire to continue the series.

Series: Agent to the Paws #1    Hardcover: 304 pages

Published: August 2017 by Minotaur Books    Source: Netgalley

Dog Dish of Doom on Goodreads

Cozy fans and animal lovers alike won’t be able to keep their paws off Dog Dish of DoomLaugh-out-loud funny, E.J. Copperman’s series debut is “lots of fun” (Library Journal, starred). 

Kay Powell wants to find that break-out client who will become a star. And she thinks she’s found him: His name is Bruno, and he has to be walked three times a day.

Kay is the Agent to the Paws, representing showbiz clients who aren’t exactly people. In fact: they’re dogs. Bruno’s humans, Trent and Louise, are pains in the you-know-what, and Les McMaster, the famous director mounting a revival of Annie, might not hire Bruno just because he can’t stand them.

This becomes less of an issue when Trent is discovered face down in Bruno’s water dish, with a kitchen knife in his back. Kay’s perfectly fine to let the NYPD handle the murder, but when the whole plot seems to center on Bruno, her protective instincts come into play. You can kill any people you want, but you’d better leave Kay’s clients alone.

deathoverdue

Review: Death Overdue by Allison Brook

Amidst all that heavy, spooky, emotional stuff I was reading for Haunting October, there was Death Overdue. A light cozy mystery (is that redundant?) about a haunted library, a cold case, and a poisonous cookie.

I mean, what more does a girl need?

Truthfully, a bit more than I got.

Carrie’s about to up and leave town when she’s offered – begrudgingly – a position as the new Director of Programs and Events at the local library. She – also begrudgingly – accepts, and of course, her first day on the job, someone gets murdered. At one of her events. The victim happens to be the detective who, after 15 years, has decided to reopen a long-cold murder case. He’s about to share his new evidence with half the town, when he keels over. If only he hadn’t eaten that cookie.

I’m sorry, but really? I don’t think I’ve ever read a cozy that deals with a cold case, and there’s probably a reason for that. (The poisoned cookie is par for the course, no issue there.) The first murder was pretty much a waste of time and energy, and didn’t do much except introduce a level of complexity that wasn’t really needed, never mind explored. Brook kept hammering home the idea that the two murders were related. Which, of course they were, but it added nothing and frankly, got a bit annoying.

And can we please talk about Jared for a second? The love interest slash murder victim #1’s son? Ugh. Just ugh ugh ugh. It wasn’t just that he was an awful character – cozies are full of awful characters. No, it was more that he wasn’t even a believable character. I simply couldn’t imagine an actual person saying the things he did, because he was so…stiff.

I did like the ghost though. She was fun.

Series: A Haunted Library Mystery #1    Hardcover: 329 pages

Published: October 2017 by Crooked Lane Books    Source: Netgalley

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Death Overdue on Goodreads

Carrie Singleton is just about done with Clover Ridge, Connecticut until she’s offered a job as the head of programs and events at the spooky local library, complete with its own librarian ghost. Her first major event is a program presented by a retired homicide detective, Al Buckley, who claims he knows who murdered Laura Foster, a much-loved part-time library aide who was bludgeoned to death fifteen years earlier. As he invites members of the audience to share stories about Laura, he suddenly keels over and dies.

The medical examiner reveals that poison is what did him in and Carrie feels responsible for having surged forward with the program despite pushback from her director. Driven by guilt, Carrie’s determined to discover who murdered the detective, convinced it’s the same man who killed Laura all those years ago. Luckily for Carrie, she has a friendly, knowledgeable ghost by her side. But as she questions the shadows surrounding Laura’s case, disturbing secrets come to light and with each step Carrie takes, she gets closer to ending up like Al.

Now it’s due or die for Carrie in Death Overdue, the delightful first in a new cozy series by Allison Brook.

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BirdBox

Review: Bird Box by Josh Malerman

When I sat down to write this post, I started by saying I didn’t remember the last time a book scared me. Like, actually scared me. But then, I realized that wasn’t true. I do remember the last time a book scared me. It was Station Eleven, and that was 2 years ago. I don’t read a lot of scary books.

Which is why I was super hesitant to pick up Bird Box, even though it has a great rating and gets a lot of love. I even mentioned in my Haunting October post how nervous I was about reading it. I pretty much expected to avoid it all month, and just “happen” to run out of time to finish my spooky book list. But then one of my lovely readers said she was reading it, and I knew it would make me a fraud if I didn’t at least give it a try.BirdBox

READ THIS BOOK PEOPLE. READ IT.

And preferably with the lights on, music blaring, and a puppy next to you for comfort.

Holy hell Bird Box is terrifying. It is utterly, unspeakably, terrifying. And it’s so brilliant, too. Because what’s terrifying isn’t the story, but the writing. Malerman writes so well that it’s like watching a movie. In one chapter I squirmed because “DO NOT PUT YOUR HAND IN THAT BUCKET NO NO NO RUN AWAY.” In another chapter, I cried because “NO PUPPY NO DON’T LOOK!!!” In yet another, I cursed because “YOU STUPID IDIOT WHY DID YOU LET HIM IN?” In short, I felt every.single.emotion every character felt in the book.

I read it in about 3 hours.

Bird Box is creepier than zombies, because you don’t know what’s happening. That’s the source of the terror – the unknown. All you know is that people see something – some sort of creature – and then go mad and kill themselves. Malorie lives in a world that she can’t see. Bird Box flashes back and forth from the present, where she’s alone with two small children, and the past, where she’s living in a house with 5 other people. Gradually, you learn what’s happened to bring the story to this point, 5 years later. Throughout all this, you learn what it’s like to not be able to see what’s threatening you, to not know what’s out there or isn’t out there.

God it’s spooky. And wonderful. And absolutely perfect.

Hardcover: 262 pages    Published: March 2014 by Ecco    Source: Purchased

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Bird Box on Goodreads

Something is out there, something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse of it, and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.

Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remains, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, she has dreamed of fleeing to a place where they might be safe. Now that the boy and girl are four, it’s time to go, but the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat–blindfolded–with nothing to rely on but her wits and the children’s trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. Something is following them all the while, but is it man, animal, or monster?

Interweaving past and present, Bird Box is a snapshot of a world unraveled that will have you racing to the final page.

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monstercalls

Review: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Next time you need either a) a good cry, or b) a reminder that you do in fact have a heart, read A Monster Calls. I’m not kidding when I say I don’t think I’ve ever cried as hard from a book. Not even when reading A Man Called Ove. It took me a good 30 minutes to stop blubbering. (And, I’d like to mention, the dogs didn’t even care.)

Lest that turn you off, please please please take my word that A Monster Calls is one of the most beautiful books you’ll ever read. Devastating, but beautiful.

The basic premise is that Conor’s mom has cancer. His dad isn’t really in the picture, and he doesn’t really want his grandmother around. It’s always been Conor and his mom, and he’d like it to stay that way thankyouverymuch. One night, after waking from yet another nightmare, Conor sees that the yew tree in his yard has turned into a monster, and is beckoning him. Turns out, the monster is there to tell Conor 3 stories, and then, Conor will tell him a 4th. That 4th story will be Conor’s “truth” – though Conor has no idea what that means.

At least, that’s the surface story. A Monster Calls is an allegory for grief, really, and done in such a way that anyone who’s ever lost someone will appreciate. Throughout the story, the Monster walks Conor through the stages of loss and grief, eventually bringing the story to a heartbreaking – yet uplifting and even cathartic – ending.

A Monster Calls is one of those books that will stay with you long after you read it. I keep thinking about the book my mom hated reading to me as a kid – I’ll Love You ForeverIt wasn’t until I was in my teens that I understood why she cried so hard every time I asked her to read it. To me, the book was a sing-songy story about having a mom – to her, it was a painful reminder that some day, we’d say goodbye. For me, A Monster Calls one was similar, but there’s a comforting aspect there too. I hope someday I have my own monster holding me.
A Monster Calls was made into a movie last year, with Liam Neeson as the yew tree. Much as I love Neeson, this is one adaptation I think I’ll pass up. Too many feels.

Hardcover: 216 pages    Published: May 2011 by Walker Books    Source: Library via Overdrive

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A Monster Calls on Goodreads

An unflinching, darkly funny, and deeply moving story of a boy, his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor.

At seven minutes past midnight, thirteen-year-old Conor wakes to find a monster outside his bedroom window. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting – he’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments. The monster in his backyard is different. It’s ancient. And wild. And it wants something from Conor. Something terrible and dangerous. It wants the truth. From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd – whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself – Patrick Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined.

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lilacskully

Review: Lilac Skully and the Haunted House by Amy Cesari

First of all, how gorgeous is that cover?

When Amy reached out to me and asked if I’d be interested in reviewing Lilac Skully and the Haunted House, I already had a pretty full plate. I’d just posted my Haunting October list, and I had a backlog of 10-12 book reviews on deck. (I’m still learning how to not overextend myself!) But the cover called to me.

I know, I know – don’t judge a book by its cover. I thoroughly disagree with this. A bad cover is not going to make me want to read your book, but a good cover will. But anyway, the book.

Lilac Skully and the Haunted House is so much fun, guys. It’s the kind of book that almost makes me wish I had a kid to read it to. For one thing, it’s got the potential for great sound effects. For another, Lilac is a really likeable character. She reminds me some of Serafina from Serafina and the Black Cloak, because she doesn’t let her fear stand in her way. She’s plucky and tenacious and utterly adorable.

And Lilac Skully is funny. Not in the ha-ha, that’s a funny story way, but in the tongue-in-cheek way that only adults will pick up on. To a kid, Lilac’s fears and thoughts are totally understandable – it makes perfect sense that Lilac is going to “meet a painful, tragic end to her short life” when she falls off the roof. It’s only as adults that we can appreciate the humor.

As for the story, the ghosts are great. The action is great. The setting is great. It’s short enough to read in one sitting, but good enough to spread out over several, if that’s your thing. The second one comes out later this month and is titled Lilac Skully and the Carriage of Lost Souls. You can bet I’ll be picking it up!

Series: The Supernatural Adventures of Lilac Skully #1    Paperback: 178 pages

Published: September 2017    Source: Author Provided

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Lilac Skully and the Haunted House on Goodreads

Home alone in a haunted house. What could go wrong?

Lilac Skully is afraid of ghosts. And a lot of other things, too. After her father’s mysterious disappearance, Lilac must find a way to deal with the notorious ghosts that haunt her home—or better yet—get them to leave.

But when intruders break in, Lilac realizes there’s a danger far worse than her spooky old house. No longer safe, Lilac will need to face her fears, trust herself, and make new friends that will change her life forever.

Lilac Skully and the Haunted House is the first book in the Supernatural Adventures of Lilac Skully, a series of fun, spooky stories with a lot of heart. If you like books about ghosts and awesome little girls—you’ll love this imaginative, haunted tale!

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Review: Wires and Nerve (Vol 1) by Marissa Meyer

People who know me well know I’m a huge fan of Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles. I picked up Cinder on a whim, simply because Cinderella is my favorite Disney Princess. The first page hooked me, and that was that. I anxiously awaited each book in the installment, and though I didn’t think it was possible, enjoyed them all just as much as the first. So, when I heard Meyer had a graphic novel coming out featuring Iko, I knew it was just a matter of time before I read it.

People who know me well also know I’m kind of cheap, which is why it’s taken me until now to actually read Wires and Nerve. Simply put, I had no trouble shelling out $25 for one of the novels, but that seemed a bit too much for what essentially amounted to a handful of comics. I don’t mean to be glib, but graphic novels take me roughly 45 minutes to read – even long ones like Wires and Nerve – and that $25 cost doesn’t seem worth it. Sorry, writers and publishers of the world.

Anyway, I requested it through Overdrive and finally last week my hold came through. Sure enough, it took me less than an hour to read. And most of that time was spent zooming in on my tablet because the pictures were too small.

But you’re not here to read about my cheapness (or are you?). You’re here to read about my thoughts on the things I read.

I freakin’ love Iko, guys. Seriously. She’s probably the most underrated character in the entire Lunar Chronicles universe. She’s funny, resourceful, and serves as the perfect balance to Cinder’s somewhat stoic demeanor. That’s not to say Iko is all fun and games. She’s just as important to the story and the world as the other characters. She’s kind of like R2D2 in Star Wars. The story would probably survive without him, but why would you want it to?

Wires and Nerve finally gives Iko the credit she’s due, though I’ll admit I wish we’d gotten an Iko novel instead. A lot of Iko’s humor and candor doesn’t translate well to the graphic style; she comes off a bit flaky and selfish. I think it’s a situation where what the reader envisions is always going to be different from what the writer envisions, and to me, that’s part of the magic of novels. Showing us a character we’ve imagined and grown to love is tricky, because it calls into question everything we’ve assigned to that character. That’s why we so frequently criticize film adaptations. The “book is better” simply because it gives us the freedom to imagine.

Series: Wires and Nerve #1    Hardcover: 238 pages

Published: January 2017 by Feiwel & Friends    Source: Library via Overdrive

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Wires and Nerve (Vol 1) on Goodreads

When rogue packs of wolf-hybrid soldiers threaten the tenuous peace alliance between Earth and Luna, Iko takes it upon herself to hunt down the soldiers’ leader. She is soon working with a handsome royal guard who forces her to question everything she knows about love, loyalty, and her own humanity. With appearances by Cinder and the rest of the Rampion crew, this is a must-have for fans of the series.

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Review: A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

Do you ever read a book and wish the world (or worlds, in this case) was real? That you could just pack a bag and travel to the place you’re reading about?

That’s how I felt listening to A Darker Shade of Magic. 

Sure, the story was interesting, and Kell and Lila certainly captured my attention. But it was the worlds of Red London and White London and Grey London that had me wishing the story was real. I mean – three parallel cities, each with their own characteristics and….personalities? Where only the outline is the same? Sounds like a wonderful set of adventures just waiting to happen.

I suppose that’s how Delilah Bard felt when Kell described it to her.

Speaking of Lila, she was really the star of the novel. Oh, Kell’s fine – if a little boring. Lila is the interesting one, and the reason for Kell’s eventual character growth. Their interactions are a lot of fun, though I’ll be honest and admit that I couldn’t decide if there’s a romance budding or if it’s more of a brother-sister kind of camaraderie. Either way, it works.

For most of the story, Kell and Lila are trying to return a dangerous magical artifact to Black London, which was long ago sealed off because it was deemed too dangerous. Items from Black London either destroy or corrupt the people who wield them – yet, strangely, Lila – who has no magic at all – seems unaffected. What follows is a fast-paced tale of carrying the artifact through the different Londons, all in an attempt to return it to Black London and therefore render it useless. Complicating matters is the fact that a handful of people (understandably) want the powerful item for themselves.

V.E. Schwab’s series gets a lot of love, and after finishing A Darker Shade of Magic it’s easy to see why. She’s created an incredible world, full of magic, but also realistic – it’s not too terribly far-fetched to imagine such things in our world, even if the thought of parallel Londons is a bit out there. Schwab has also written two vastly different, yet incredibly similar characters – characters that as a reader, you want to root for. Or want to be.

Stylistically, A Darker Shade of Magic reminds me of a cross between The Magicians and The Name of the Wind. While written for adults, I think it’s accessible enough that younger readers would easily enjoy it too. Definitely give this one a try if you’re a fantasy fan!

Series: Shades of Magic #1    Hardcover: 400 pages    Audio: 12 hours

Published: February 2015 by Tor Books    Source: Purchased via Scribd

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A Darker Shade of Magic on Goodreads

Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black.

Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see.

Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand.

After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure.

Now perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, they’ll first need to stay alive.

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Blog Tour: The Other Alcott by Elise Hooper

I vaguely remember reading a kid-friendly version of Little Women as a child – I’m not sure I ever read the full book, but I got enough of the gist to understand why everyone loved it. (That reminds me, I should probably read it as an adult – I’ll add that to the list.) I didn’t know much about Louisa May Alcott, but when I read the synopsis for The Other Alcott, I was immediately intrigued. Another Alcott sister, one who bucked convention as well? Sign me up.

Unfortunately, The Other Alcott failed to grab me, and this one is a DNF. Much as I tried, I couldn’t relate to May. The more I read, the more interested I was in Louisa – which is kinda the exact opposite of what The Other Alcott is trying to do. I don’t necessarily think this is anything to do with Hooper’s writing, but more about me as a reader. May reminded me a bit of other characters I’ve had trouble with –  Ellie in Summer at the Dog and Duck, Scarlett in Caraval, Cheryl Strayed in Wild…women who are billed as strong characters, but who have moments of such galling weakness that it makes me scratch my head and wonder if the author is trying to make them appear vulnerable (but leaning too far into it), or if the strength is a facade. If you’re the kind of reader who really likes watching a character constantly try to redeem themselves, The Other Alcott will likely be right up your alley. For me, it felt a little too whiny, and I wasn’t invested enough to give May a chance.

I’d love to read this with a book club though, because I suspect there’s a lot to talk about – especially if the book is paired with Little Women, and you compare and contrast May and Amy March. Someone do that, and fill me in!!

Paperback: 432 pages    Published: September 2017 by William Morrow    Source: Publisher via TLC

The Other Alcott on Goodreads

Elise Hooper’s debut novel conjures the fascinating, untold story of May Alcott—Louisa’s youngest sister and an artist in her own right.

We all know the story of the March sisters, heroines of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. But while everyone cheers on Jo March, based on Louisa herself, Amy March is often the least favorite sister. Now, it’s time to learn the truth about the real “Amy”, Louisa’s sister, May.

Stylish, outgoing, creative, May Alcott grows up longing to experience the wide world beyond Concord, Massachusetts. While her sister Louisa crafts stories, May herself is a talented and dedicated artist, taking lessons in Boston, turning down a marriage proposal from a well-off suitor, and facing scorn for entering what is very much a man’s profession.

Life for the Alcott family has never been easy, so when Louisa’s Little Women is published, its success eases the financial burdens they’d faced for so many years. Everyone agrees the novel is charming, but May is struck to the core by the portrayal of selfish, spoiled “Amy March.” Is this what her beloved sister really thinks of her?

So May embarks on a quest to discover her own true identity, as an artist and a woman. From Boston to Rome, London, and Paris, this brave, talented, and determined woman forges an amazing life of her own, making her so much more than merely The Other Alcott.

“Elise Hooper’s thoroughly modern debut gives a fresh take on one of literature’s most beloved families. To read this book is to understand why the women behind Little Women continue to cast a long shadow on our imaginations and dreams. Hooper is a writer to watch!”—Elisabeth Egan, author of A Window Opens

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Photo by Chris Landry Photography

About Elise Hooper

Though a New Englander by birth (and at heart), Elise Hooper lives with her husband and two young daughters in Seattle, where she teaches history and literature.

Find out more about Elise at her website, and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Check out the rest of the Blog Tour stops, and show your fellow readers some love!

 

Thanks to TLC Book Tours and William Morrow for the chance to participate in this tour!