Category Archives: Fiction

Review: The River of Kings by Taylor Brown

About The River of Kingstheriverofkings

Hardcover: 336 pages
Published: March 2017 by St. Martin’s Press
Source:
 Netgalley

Goodreads DescriptionTwo brothers travel a storied river’s past and present in search of the truth about their father’s death in the second novel by the acclaimed author of Fallen Land.

The Altamaha River, Georgia’s “Little Amazon,” has been named one of the 75 “Last Great Places in the World.” Crossed by roads only five times in its 137-mile length, the blackwater river is home to thousand-year-old virgin cypress, descendants of 18th-century Highland warriors, and a motley cast of rare and endangered species. The Altamaha has even been rumored to harbor its own river monster, as well as traces of the most ancient European fort in North America.

Brothers Hunter and Lawton Loggins set off to kayak the river, bearing their father’s ashes toward the sea. Hunter is a college student, Lawton a Navy SEAL on leave; both young men were raised by an angry, enigmatic shrimper who loved the river, and whose death remains a mystery that his sons hope to resolve. As the brothers proceed downriver, their story is interwoven with that of Jacques Le Moyne, an artist who accompanied the 1564 expedition to found a French settlement at the river’s mouth, which began as a search for riches and ended in a bloody confrontation with Spanish conquistadors and native tribes, leaving the fort in ruins and a few survivors fleeing for their lives.

In The River of Kings, SIBA-bestselling author Taylor Brown artfully weaves three narrative strands—the brothers’ journey, their father’s past, and the dramatic history of the river’s earliest people—to evoke a legendary place and its powerful hold on the human imagination.

My Review

The River of Kings is a story about family. About love, about triumph, and about truth. It’s a beautiful story, or rather, set of stories – the book covers three time periods. If you’ve ever read Michener, Brown’s writing reminds me quite a bit of his.

I read this one slowly, only a couple of chapters at a time. The writing is lyrical, but dense. I wanted to read because I enjoyed the style, but had a hard time staying engaged with the story. As often happens with books where the timeline shifts, I’d get engrossed in one story only to be moved to the next. And so on. It wasn’t frustrating, exactly, but made it that much easier to put the book down.

Because of that, or perhaps because of my mood, I ended up listing this one as abandoned. I simply don’t have the dedication to offer The River of Kings at the moment. Maybe I’ll pick it up again. It’s a great book, just not at the right time for me.

3 stars

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

Review: Assault and Pepper by Leslie Budewitz

About Assault and Pepperassaultandpepper

Series: A Spice Shop Mystery (#1)
Kindle Edition: 304 pages
Published: March 2015 by Berkley
Source:
 Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionThe Agatha Award-winning author of Crime Rib is proud to introduce Pepper Reece, the owner of the Seattle Spice Shop who thinks she can handle any kind of salty customer—until a murderer ends up in the mix…

After leaving a dicey marriage and losing a beloved job in a corporate crash, Pepper Reece has found a new zest for life running a busy spice and tea shop in Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Her aromatic creations are the talk of the town, and everyone stops by for a cup of her refreshing spice tea, even other shopkeepers and Market regulars. But when a panhandler named Doc shows up dead on the store’s doorstep, a Seattle Spice Shop cup in his hand, the local gossip gets too hot for Pepper to handle—especially after the police arrest one of Pepper’s staffers, Tory Finch, for murder.

Tory seems to know why she’s a suspect, but she refuses to do anything to curry favor with the cops. Convinced her reticent employee is innocent, Pepper takes it on herself to sniff out some clues. Only, if she’s not careful, Pepper’s nosy ways might make her next on the killer’s list…

My Review

Assault and Pepper is the first book in Leslie Budewitz’s Spice Shop Mystery series. Pepper has recently lost her job, divorced her detective husband, and purchased the Seattle Spice Shop. She’s just starting to get the hang of being a small business owner in downtown Seattle, when one of the area’s local panhandlers dies outside her store. The police quickly deem it murder, and soon arrest one of Pepper’s employees.

If you’re like me and sometimes skip straight to the rating (it’s fine, we all do it), you’ll see this wasn’t a hit for me. For one thing, I felt like I didn’t know Pepper – or any of the other characters – any better at the end of the story than at the beginning. There just wasn’t enough character development. Because of that, I truly didn’t care what happened.

I also didn’t really care about the mystery, because to me the killer was painstakingly obvious. Part of it was the fact that the person was mentioned and then more or less ignored. If you read enough cozies (which I do), that’s a sure sign that’s whodunit. The other part was the method – poisoning requires certain knowledge, and there’s a small number of likely candidates. If you read Assault and Pepper, come back and tell me how long it took you to guess the murderer.

What I did enjoy, though, were all the descriptions of spices. Which is funny, because a lot of reviewers seem to think there was too much spice talk! For me, the lack of character and plot development made the spices the only interesting part of the book.

I ended up skimming the last third or so of Assault and Pepper, but I don’t regret reading it. Cozies are generally quick and light. If you’re a fan of the genre, this one might be worth keeping for a rainy day.

Review: The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

About The Bear and the Nightingalethebearandthenightingale

Hardcover: 322 pages
Audio: 11 hours
Published: January 2017 by Random House Audio
Source: Purchased (Scribd Audiobooks)

Goodreads DescriptionAt the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn’t mind—she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

After Vasilisa’s mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa’s new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa’s stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed—this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse’s most frightening tales.

My Review

It took me nearly two months to read this, mostly because I didn’t do a whole lot of driving. That said, though, I wasn’t super engrossed in The Bear and the Nightingale, much to my dismay. I was super excited when it came out, and I’ve seen a lot of great reviews for it. More on that in a minute.

The Bear and the Nightingale is more or less a fairytale set in the Russian wilderness. Vasilisa is a young girl who loves the woods – and who can see and interact with the house spirits. Either of those things alone would make her different, but both together make her feared and misunderstood. As the story progresses and the demons come closer, Vasilisa’s gifts become her strengths.

It’s actually a bit difficult for me to describe the story, because truthfully, there’s not much of it. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Where The Bear and the Nightingale shines is in the world-building. Arden brings the Russian wilderness to life in a way few other writers can. Listening to this, I could easily picture the setting, even though I’ve never been to Russia and have certainly never been to Russia in the wilderness in whatever time period this book was set. (I couldn’t figure it out, but assumed it was sometime in the 1600s.)

The Bear and the Nightingale is the kind of book I’m glad I read, simply for it’s beauty and style. The best part of the book was the last hour or so (not sure what that translates to in pages, sorry!). Is it one I’d heartily recommend? Perhaps, if you’re looking for something graceful and atmospheric. If you’re looking for something gripping and thrilling – no.

Review: Snow Blood Season 4 by Carol McKibben

snowbloodseason4About Snow Blood Season 4

• Series: Snow Blood (#4)
• Kindle Edition:
 102 pages
• Published: December 2016 by Troll River Publications
• Source:
 Purchased (Amazon)

Goodreads DescriptionContinuing the paranormal adventures of Brogio, the First Vampire, and his kindred dog, Snow Blood…

Just as Snow Blood secures Nova’s love, a dark stranger in the forest warns of impending danger. The vampire clan is forewarned of new approaching threats. This time two daunting enemies return for blood, threatening both Brogio and his beloved children.

A Kresnick hunter, out for revenge, is dead-set on Brogio’s destruction and places Snow Blood’s pack in the crosshairs. All the while, another familiar force of evil threatens Brogio’s kindred. As the family comes together to strategize ways on how to overcome this new menacing threat, Snow Blood is led to another intriguing path. He discovers a heavenly interest in the continuing evil that haunts his loved ones.

Trying to discover secrets to help in the defeat of the new foes unravels the role of Kane’s friend, Seth. What part does he play in the returning evil? Along the way of these new journeys, he is surprised to discover the white witch’s true nature.

Relentless and merciless enemies plague our favorite vampire family at every turn. Snow Blood again fights to protect all of those he loves against destruction. A dangerous plot to draw out the elusive enemy could save innocent lives, as well as their own. All the while, the future of mankind hangs in the balance.

My Thoughts

I make no secret of that fact that I’ve fallen 100% in love with Carol McKibben’s Snow Blood series. I got a review copy of Snow Blood Season 1 last year (here’s that review), and enjoyed it so much that I purchased Seasons 2 and 3, and then pre-ordered Season 4. Season 4 came out in December, but I totally forgot about it. Two pages in, and I was immediately sorry I’d waited so long to read it.

Snow Blood Season 4 picks up right where Season 3 leaves off, which, since I haven’t reviewed won’t mean much to you. In a nutshell, Snow Blood is a husky-turned-vampire who serves Brogio, the first vampire. Oh, and Snow Blood has his very own vampire wolf-pack. Together with Brogio and his ladylove Selene, Snow Blood and his pack (plus all their friends and progeny) fight evil. Sometimes that evil is ancient Greek gods and goddesses. Actually, most of the time it’s ancient Greek gods and goddesses. In Season 4 there’s even a winged horse.

Believe me, I know. It sound absolutely absurd. I won’t even pretend that’s not the case. But the series is SO.MUCH.FUN. Seriously – I love these books. I’m anxiously awaiting a new installment, and I’ve tried to convince everyone I know to fork over the 99 cents for the first book, because it’s truly just a joy to read. (And hey, if you have Kindle Unlimited it’s free, so READ SNOW BLOOD.) Rarely do I push a book as much as I push these.

Truthfully, Season 4 wasn’t quite as great as the first three, but that didn’t matter in the slightest.

3 stars

Book Club: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

thehateugiveAbout The Hate U Give

• Book Club: May 2017 
• Hardcover: 
453 pages
• Published: February 2017 by Balzer & Bray
• Source: Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionSixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Why We Picked It

It’s relevant, it’s timely, it’s YA (our May theme), and it’s one of the most talked about books of the year already. And because our Book Club is in-the-know, you know?

My Thoughts

I’m always hesitant to review culturally relevant books, because unless I give them a 5-star rating, inevitably someone gives me the “how do you not think this is the most amazing book ever” reaction. And I get that, I really do – there are books that are well-regarded and well-loved not because they’re necessarily well-written, but because they deal with a theme that’s important or timely or taboo. And the other side of that is true as well – there are books that are loved because they’re well-written, but deal with robots and love triangles and neon-green puppies. In a way, that’s the beauty of books. Reading is a personal experience, and what speaks to one reader may or may not speak to another. Things that drive me crazy will no doubt seem inconsequential to some of you (and vice versa).

With all that said, I’d had several people recommend The Hate U Give as being an excellent book for our times. If you’ve had your ear even just a little bit to the book world, you’ve no doubt heard of it, and heard how wonderful it is. When one of the Book Club girls suggested it for our YA theme, I was more than happy to read it – not because it was something I was particularly interested in, but because I saw the value in reading it.

The Hate U Give is about Starr, a 16-year-old girl who witnesses her childhood friend Khalil being pulled over and eventually shot by a police officer. The book focuses on Starr’s reaction to the situation, as well as the community’s – both black and white. We follow Starr to school, read about her conflicting emotions as she balances her life at home in Garden Heights with the life she’s created at her mostly-white prep school. We watch her family deal with the ever-growing gang presence, compounded by the fact that Garden Heights simply does not have the opportunities more affluent neighborhoods do. And we watch as both sides come to terms with the issues surrounding the question of race and equality.

And here’s where I have to be honest. I didn’t hate The Hate U Give, but I didn’t love it either. I absolutely understand why it’s gotten so much press, and I’m glad for that. But as a book, taken purely on the content and style and form? It lacks so much.

I questioned Starr’s credibility right from the beginning, because her emotions and reactions and thoughts are so inconsistent. One second she’s afraid to speak, the next, she’s telling all who will listen. She talks about loyalty and family and love, and then denies any relation or connection to that very same family. For the majority of the story, she lets other people make decisions for her, seemingly content to be lost in the background.

Before you point out that she’s 16 years old, yes, she is. And yes, she’s just been involved in a horrible, traumatic event, and yes, the world she lives in is vastly different from mine. The issue isn’t so much that she’s not a strong character – it’s that she’s portrayed as one, and written as another.  I was never able to truly care about her, and with a storyline like this one, it’s critical to care about your character.

It’s also entirely too long. I could have lost about 200 pages and still gotten the gist of the story.

Book Club Discussion

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your point of view), we all had similar reactions to the book. None of us hated it, but all of us felt the author missed out on a golden opportunity to really inspire change. The issues raised in The Hate U Give are incredibly important, but unless someone has absolutely no grasp of recent events, they’re issues most of us are already aware exist. In that regard, the book felt a little like a “rage against the machine” kind of approach, though I don’t mean that to say that it’s full of angst and hate. In fact, quite the opposite, as the themes of family and community are actually quite admirable. Simply, had Thomas been able to include solutions, or even attempts at reconciling the issues – or at the very least, beginning to address them – it could have been incredibly valuable in changing the current dialogue. (I realize that’s easier said than done; however, it’s not always enough to simply highlight an issue.)

We talked at length about that, and about how we’d wished we had someone who either disagreed with us or had had a different upbringing. As white, middle-class, college-educated young women, it was incredibly difficult to imagine a world like Starr’s.

Bottom line? The Hate U Give is an important – if not entirely engrossing – read that makes for great discussion. It doesn’t shy away from the truth, but doesn’t assault you with it either. My hope is that as people read it, they begin to recognize some of the more deeply rooted issues in our society, and begin thinking of ways to look at the world a little differently.

June’s Book Club Theme: In a Land Far, Far Away…

June’s Book Club Book: The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald

Review: Asking for Truffle by Dorothy St. James

askingfortruffleAbout Asking for Truffle

Series: A Southern Chocolate Shop Mystery (#1)
Kindle Edition: 304 pages
Published: September 2017 by Crooked Lane Books
Source:
 NetGalley

Goodreads DescriptionWhen Charity Penn receives a letter saying she won a trip to Camellia Beach, South Carolina complete with free cooking lessons at the town’s seaside chocolate shop, The Chocolate Box, she’s immediately skeptical. She never entered any contest. Her former prep school friend offers to look into the phony prize–only to end up drowned in a vat of chocolate.

Struck with guilt, Penn heads to the southern beach town to investigate why he was killed. But as wary as she is of the locals, she finds herself lured into their eccentric vibe, letting her defenses melt away and even learning the art of crafting delicious chocolates. That is, until delight turns bittersweet as she steps straight into the midst of a deadly plot to destroy the seaside town. Now, only Penn’s quick thinking and a mysterious cask of rare chocolate can save the town she’s learning to love.

Rich and decadent, Asking for Truffle, the first in a new cozy series by Dorothy St. James, is sure to be a delectable read for fans of JoAnna Carl and Joanne Fluke.

My Review

I really am a sucker for dogs on covers. But I mean, I love cozy mysteries, and this one promised to talk about chocolate. Can’t go wrong there, right?

I’ll just come right out and say it – you really have to stick with this one. Penn is awful for the majority of the book – she’s self-centered, and has an enormous chip on her shoulder. For much of the novel, the secondary characters are the only thing keeping it alive. I kept reading because I wanted to know more about Mabel and Bertie and the rest of Camellia Beach.

But, by the end of the novel, I was actually rooting for Penn. She grows just a tiny bit, enough to make her tolerable. Same with her dog, Stella – actually, the two are kinda similar. Stella bites, and Penn probably would too if she were a dog. By the end, both are nipping instead of chomping…progress right?

The mystery was actually pretty strong, if a little hard to follow at times. I did think the murderer was obvious, but I don’t fault the author for that. I read a ton of cozy mysteries, so I’m good at spotting the killer, and it’s incredibly rare for me to be surprised.

I loved learning about chocolate though, and the town spirit was rather enjoyable. I can see myself picking up the next book in the series to see how Penn’s decision plays out in the next book.

Bottom line? Asking for Truffle is a sweet start to the Southern Chocolate Shop series.

3 stars

Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC! 

Review: Summer at the Dog & Duck by Jill Steeples

About Summer at the Dog & Duck

• Series: Dog & Duck (#2)
 Kindle Edition: 241 pages
• Published: June 2017 by Aria
• Source:
 NetGalley

Goodreads DescriptionThe perfect summer read. Continuing the light hearted, uplifting dramas around the The Dog & Duck pub and the life of its landlady Ellie Browne.

Ellie Browne has found happiness running The Dog & Duck pub in the idyllic village of Little Leyton, and her blossoming romance with tall, handsome property developer, Max Golding, is going swimmingly. With her new best friend, Digby, the black Labrador at her side, life just couldn’t be sweeter.

But their peace is shattered when Max’s younger sister, Katy, turns up unannounced with a whole heap of attitude. And Max’s loyalties are stretched further when his glamorous ex, Sasha, re-appears with her own burgeoning secret.

With the master of the manor preoccupied with the demands of his ‘other women’, Ellie’s forced to consider if she has any role to play in Max’s life or in the village of Little Leyton.

Can Ellie get her life and relationship back on track in time for the summer charity ball at Braithwaite Manor?

My Thoughts

Ellie is back! It’s now Summer at the Dog & Duck, and Ellie has settled into her life in Little Leyton. She’s running the bar, dating Max, and spending time with her friends Josie and Polly. Life couldn’t be sweeter….and then Max’s kid sister Katy and super-hot ex-girlfriend Sasha show up in town.

I rather enjoyed Winter at the Dog & Duck. I thought it was fun, if not completely absorbing. I hate to say it, but Ellie REALLY got on my nerves in this one. So much so that at one point, I didn’t think I’d be able to finish it. Polly and Josie – and wanting to know more about the handsome newcomer, George – kept me going. I also liked Katy a lot, but the whole storyline with Ellie and Max made me want to throw in the towel.

Max is….I don’t know. He’s not terrible, but he’s got some issues and what happens is Ellie gets all worked up about how much of a jerk he’s being and then ends up apologizing. Yes, you read that right – Ellie apologizes to Max when Max is the one who should be apologizing to her. It really irked me. Maybe I’m just tired of reading about unhealthy relationships. Shrug.

I don’t think I’ll be continuing the series, which is a little bit of a shame – it’s great fluff reading, and the setting is lots of fun. Too bad the characters just don’t do it for me! I’m being generous and giving this one a 3 star rating, but truthfully it’s more along the lines of 2.5.

3 stars

Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC! 

Review: Winter at the Dog & Duck by Jill Steeples

winterdog&duckAbout Winter at the Dog & Duck

• Series: Dog & Duck (#1)
 Kindle Edition: 260 pages
• Published: September 2016 by Aria
• Source:
 Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionA perfect, feel-good romantic novel to curl up with this Christmas. A story of new beginnings, love and friendship. Perfect for the fans of Jenny Colgan and Lucy Diamond.

Ellie Browne has left behind her high-flying job in London to return to the charming Buckinghamshire village of Little Leyton. Working shifts at The Dog and Duck and running her own doggy-day-care business, Ellie’s looking for a much simpler way of life and a good old fashioned Christmas.

But Little Leyton’s landscape is changing; Johnny Tay, Ellie’s ex, wants to pick up where they left off; sultry property developer Max Golding, has moved into the village and is ruffling feathers; and rumour has it that the pub, which holds a special place in Ellie’s heart, might be sold. Suddenly, life’s looking a whole lot more complicated…

Can Ellie juggle her emotions and commitments in time to celebrate Christmas?

My Thoughts

I adore the cover of this one. Isn’t it fun?

I picked up Winter at the Dog & Duck because I managed to snag the sequel, Summer at the Dog & Duck, through Netgalley, and I hate reading books out of order. Yes, I’m one of those people.

In Winter at the Dog & Duck, we meet Ellie, our quirky heroine. She’s newly jobless, and back in her hometown trying her hand at dog-walking and beer-pouring. Ellie is taking some time to figure out what her future holds, and what better place than Little Leyton? But then, she finds out her beloved pub (the Dog & Duck) is going to be sold, and nobody knows to whom. And there’s that pesky, oh-so-good-looking Max Golding running around like he owns the place…..

Winter at the Dog & Duck is a fun little read. Ellie isn’t my favorite character – at times, she’s pretty annoying – but the plot is simple enough and the dialogue well-written enough that her flaws didn’t bother me too much. It was really interesting to me how she was portrayed. On one hand, she’s a successful corporate accountant. On the other, she comes off as an overly-dramatic twenty-something who hasn’t quite figured out how to adult. I really got the sense that she was in a period of transition, so I applaud the way Steeples wrote her.

I wanted to visit Little Leyton, and I’m really looking forward to reading the second book so I can see more of it. Steeples does a great job creating a little oasis in the town, and it felt perfectly cozy and welcoming. In fact, the whole book reminded me of a cozy mystery, except there’s really no mystery. I kept wondering what in the world the book was about, and what a second book would be about. I finally realized it’s just a cute little chick lit book – some romance, some friendships, some stress, but nothing terribly earth-shattering or serious. Escape reading at its finest!

3 stars

Review: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg

joyfultroubleAbout Joyful Trouble

• Kindle Edition: 180 pages
• Published: April 2017
• Source: Direct from Author

Goodreads DescriptionA humorous read about an incredible dog and how he had found his true, yet unexpected calling. A dog. A friendship. A purpose.
When a Great Dane arrives in a navy base nobody expects him to win everybody’s hearts, although breaking some rules along the way. But things soon turn sour as somebody threatens to put him to sleep. Who will stand up for this for-legged gentle giant? Tackling universal themes and voicing animal rights and the importance of fighting for what is right.

About Patricia Furstenberg

Patricia Furstenberg writes children stories about real and imaginary dogs and about animals in general. She believes each creature has a story and a voice, if only we stop to listen. He first children’s book Happy Friends, is also available from Amazon. You can read more animal stories and poems on her author website, Alluring Creations.

She is a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition.

My Thoughts on Joyful Trouble

When Patricia reached out to me about reviewing her book, I made it as far in her email as “Joyful Trouble is based on the true story of the only dog….” and knew I was going to read it. (This should come as no surprise if you’ve been here a while.)

Joyful Trouble tells us the story of the Great Dane, Trouble, the only dog to enlist in the Royal Navy during WWII. Everyone loves Trouble, and the enlistment comes about as a way to save him from certain death – you see, Trouble has a tendency to ride the train without a ticket, and the Railway Authorities are none too pleased. The soldiers who come to know Trouble on the train just can’t let this happen.

We learn Trouble’s story by eavesdropping on a Grandfather’s story to his grandchildren. Joyful Trouble is a simple story, and as an adult reader I’d have liked a little more about what Trouble did after enlisting – however, I don’t think that’s necessary for the young audience. If you’re like me and want to know more, here’s Trouble’s – aka, Nuisance’s – Wikipedia page.

This is a quick read that lends itself well to a parent reading to their own children. There’s no fluff here, though – we get Trouble’s story without smoothing over any of the less savory details. However, it’s told well, and we’re left with a warm fuzzy feeling after reading it.

Thanks to author Patricia Furstenberg for the review copy!  

Blog Tour: Blue’s Prophecy by Emily Ross

bluesprophecyAbout Blue’s Prophecy

• Series: The Canis Chronicles (#1)
• Kindle Edition:
 230 pages
• Published: May 2017 by TitleTown Publishing
• Source: Publisher via YA Bound Book Tours

Goodreads DescriptionTwo genetically altered dogs, two different fates. One is Robo, a beloved Great Dane, who is tricked out of the embrace of his human family and then is horribly altered by an evil scientist who rebuilds him with robotic parts, weaponizing the dog for money from the military. But that s not all the scientist does the experiments he conducts leave Robo a genius, almost immortal and with powers beyond explanation. But the horror Robo experiences at the scientist’s hands changes him, driving him insane with the sole mission to destroy all humans, especially those who have tortured and hurt dogs.

Meanwhile, a scrappy alley husky sits in a shelter, when she with her blue eyes and tough wolf-like features captures the attention of another group of scientists desperate to stop Robo from his path of destruction. This dog, called Blue, could be the chosen one to fight and defeat Robo. She is also genetically enhanced and left with glowing turquoise eyes before being released to face Robo’s vicious dog army. Her mission: save human civilization and the packs of dogs she’s grown to love.

About Emily Ross

Emily Ross, 13, is a fifth generation writer and an owner of three dogs, Balta, Buddy and Zoey. Her prose exceeds her years, with Emily starting work on Blue’s Prophecy, a science fiction/fantasy book for pre-teens and teens, when she was 10. Living in Atlanta, Emily is also an animator and a skilled archer, and relaxes by playing the double bass in her middle school orchestra.

WebsiteTwitterFacebook

My Thoughts on Blue’s Prophecy

It’s a well-known fact that any book with a dog on the cover or featuring a dog is going to make it onto my “must-read-now” list. So it’ll come as no surprise that I literally jumped at the chance to participate in the blog tour for Blue’s Prophecy. I mean, look at that cover. Go ahead, look. I’ll wait.

Plus, the idea for Blue’s Prophecy is pretty unique – genetically engineered robot dogs? Yes, please.

The story focuses on Robo, a Great Dane who’s been ripped from his family and turned into a half-robot dog. Robo has, among other “improvements,” a metal leg and implants in his brain and eye that make it possible for him to shoot lasers and speak English. Then there’s Blue, a husky who’s lived on the streets her entire life, and who’s just fine being on her own. Until, that is, she saves a couple of abandoned puppies from one of Robo’s cronies. All of a sudden, Blue finds herself thrust into a fight to save humanity from Robo’s warped sense of justice.

Blue’s Prophecy was so much fun. If you’ve read any of the Survivors books, it’s a similar feel – dogs against the world. I loved the pack dynamics, and the way Blue really grew from a lone wolf to a pack leader. And I’m honestly blown away that this book was written by someone as young as Emily Ross. The only thing that gave her away as a new writer was the story’s timeline – I had a hard time keeping up with where in time things happened. I think that’s an easy fix, solved by simply giving the reader a few “the next day” type markers. I expect we’ll see a little more of that in Emily’s next books, along with a little more backstory for the characters. As a first novel, however, this one is a solid, enjoyable read.

And that cover.

Check out the rest of the Blog Tour stops below, and show your fellow readers some love!

May 8Zerina Blossom’s Books and Reading for the Stars and Moon and 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, & Sissy, Too!  

May 9The Avid Reader  and The Silver Dagger Scriptorium and Crystal’s Chaotic Confessions 

May 10She’s All Booked (that’s me!!) and The Cover Contessa

May 11Adventures thru Wonderland and Books,Dreams,Life

May 12SolaFide Book Club and Diane’s Book Blog

May 15I Read Indie and Shh, I am Reading

May 16: Two Heartbeats

May 17Haddie’s Haven and Booklove

May 18Booker T’s Farm: Books & Nails & Puppy Dog Tales and Lukten av trykksverte, and YA Book Divas

May 19: CBY Book Club and Loves Great Reads

Big thanks to YA Bound Book Tours and TitleTown Publishing for the chance to participate in this tour!