Category Archives: Nonfiction

Review: Manny the Frenchie’s Art of Happiness

mannythefrenchieAbout Manny the Frenchie’s Art of Happiness

Hardcover: 160 pages
Published: June 2017 by Touchstone
Source:
 Netgalley

Goodreads DescriptionBased on his popular Instagram feed @Manny_the_Frenchie and Facebook profile, this is an illustrated and humorous guide to living a happy and fulfilling life by “the most famous French bulldog in the world…who’s downright amazing” (Buzzfeed.com).

In 2011, Manny was the runt of the litter and on his way to a shelter. But when his parents scooped him up, named him after the world famous boxer, Manny Pacquiao, and began posting photos of him sleeping in their sink accompanied by humorous, optimistic captions, Manny went viral.

Whether he’s wearing sunglasses, hitting up music festivals, or sleeping in adorable costumes, this little Frenchie always encourages a positive, do-gooder outlook to his followers. Packed with cheeky humor, witty wisdom, and charming anecdotes, Manny the Frenchie’s Art of Happiness will satisfy dog lovers of all breeds.

My Review

I’m ashamed to say I didn’t follow Manny the Frenchie on Instagram until after reading his book (you can bet I do now!). How I’ve been missing out! What a cutie. I mean, really, French Bulldogs might be the most endearing dogs in the entire world. Those squishy faces, those expressive eyes, those bat ears. When I get old and can’t handle big strong dogs anymore, I’m going to have a French Bulldog, a Corgi, and an Italian Greyhound. They’re all going to be best buddies.

But back to Manny.

His book is full of adorable photos of him and his siblings, and lots of words of wisdom about the important things in life: family, food, and of course….naps. It’s a great reminder about priorities, and about the beautiful beings we are fortunate enough to share our lives with. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and it’d make a great gift for any dog lover.

3 stars

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

Review: Eyes Wide Open by Isaac Lidsky

isaaclidskybookAbout Eyes Wide Open

• Hardcover: 320 pages
• Published: March 2017 by Kensington
• Source:
 Netgalley

Goodreads DescriptionIn Eyes Wide Open, Isaac Lidsky draws on his experience of achieving immense success, joy, and fulfillment while losing his sight to a blinding disease to show us that it isn’t external circumstances, but how we perceive and respond to them, that governs our reality.

Fear has a tendency to give us tunnel vision–we fill the unknown with our worst imaginings and cling to what’s familiar. But when confronted with new challenges, we need to think more broadly and adapt. When Isaac Lidsky learned that he was beginning to go blind at age thirteen, eventually losing his sight entirely by the time he was twenty-five, he initially thought that blindness would mean an end to his early success and his hopes for the future. Paradoxically, losing his sight gave him the vision to take responsibility for his reality and thrive. Lidsky graduated from Harvard College at age nineteen, served as a Supreme Court law clerk, fathered four children, and turned a failing construction subcontractor into a highly profitable business.

Whether we’re blind or not, our vision is limited by our past experiences, biases, and emotions. Lidsky shows us how we can overcome paralyzing fears, avoid falling prey to our own assumptions and faulty leaps of logic, silence our inner critic, harness our strength, and live with open hearts and minds. In sharing his hard-won insights, Lidsky shows us how we too can confront life’s trials with initiative, humor, and grace.

My Thoughts

If you’ve never seen Isaac Lidsky’s Ted Talk, stop right now and watch. It’s 12 minutes long, and worth the investment. It’ll also give you a good idea of what to expect from his book.

It took me a while to read Eyes Wide Open, though that has less to do with the book and more to do with my own time management skills. Lidsky writes well, with humor and grace, and it’s almost like having a conversation with him. He’s an inspiring man, that’s for sure.

I appreciated that Lidsky doesn’t hold back, but he also doesn’t fall into melodrama. He’s straightforward about his sight (and the loss of it), and then even more so about moving forward. Reading Eyes Wide Open, you really understand that while his experience shaped him, the lessons he learned are ones that can apply to all of us.

3 stars

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

Blog Tour: How To Be Everything by Emilie Wapnick

emiliewapnickbookAbout How To Be Everything

• Hardcover: 240 pages
• Published: May 2017 by HarperOne
• Source: Publisher via TLC Book Tours

Goodreads DescriptionWhat do you want to be when you grow up? It’s a familiar question we’re all asked as kids. While seemingly harmless, the question has unintended consequences. It can make you feel like you need to choose one job, one passion, one thing to be about. Guess what? You don’t.

Having a lot of different interests, projects and curiosities doesn’t make you a “jack-of-all-trades, master of none.” Your endless curiosity doesn’t mean you are broken or flaky. What you are is a multipotentialite: someone with many interests and creative pursuits. And that is actually your biggest strength.

How to Be Everything helps you channel your diverse passions and skills to work for you. Based on her popular TED talk, “Why some of us don’t have one true calling”, Emilie Wapnick flips the script on conventional career advice. Instead of suggesting that you specialize, choose a niche or accumulate 10,000 hours of practice in a single area, Wapnick provides a practical framework for building a sustainable life around ALL of your passions.
You’ll discover:
•  Why your multipotentiality is your biggest strength, especially in today’s uncertain job market.
•  How to make a living and structure your work if you have many skills and interests.
•  How to focus on multiple projects and make progress on all of them.
•  How to handle common insecurities such as the fear of not being the best, the guilt associated with losing interest in something you used to love and the challenge of explaining “what you do” to others.

Not fitting neatly into a box can be a beautiful thing. How to Be Everything teaches you how to design a life, at any age and stage of your career, that allows you to be fully you, and find the kind of work you’ll love.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

About Emilie Wapnick

Emilie Wapnick is a speaker, career coach, blogger, and community leader. She is the founder and creative director at Puttylike.com, where she helps multipotentialites integrate all of their interests to create dynamic, fulfilling, and fruitful careers and lives. Unable to settle on a single path, Emilie studied music, art, film production, and law, graduating from the Law Faculty at McGill University in 2011. Emilie is a TED speaker and has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, The Financial Times, The Huffington Post, and Lifehacker. Her TED talk, “Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling,” has been viewed over 3.5 million times, and has been translated into 36 languages. She has been hired as a guest speaker and workshop facilitator at universities, high schools, and organizations across the United States and internationally.

Find out more about Emilie at her website, and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

My Thoughts

Guys, I honestly don’t even know what to say about Emilie Wapnick’s How to Be Everything, other than if you’ve ever felt like there was something wrong with you because you simply couldn’t pick just ONE THING, you need to go read it right now.

When I picked up How to Be Everything, I hadn’t watched Wapnick’s TED Talk. I’d never heard of her, never heard of the term “multipotentialite.” I simply liked the description of the book.

I read the entire thing in one night.

As I read, I felt like Wapnick was speaking directly to me. Like she was in my head, in my heart, and in my soul. She got me. For the first time, someone was telling me it was ok – no, it was awesome – to have a million interests and passions and ideas. That just because I’m not an “expert” in one thing, that I haven’t devoted my entire life to one career or one purpose, that I struggle with defining what I want from a career – that doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with me. Quite the opposite, in fact. It means I have tons of potential, and that I need to embrace my ideas.

How to Be Everything is full of affirmation for those of us who’ve struggled with boredom or the feeling of jumping around and around with no idea which way is up. First, Wapnick describes what it means to be a multipotentialite, and what our strengths are. I actually laughed out loud in this part – superpower #1 is “Idea Synthesis,” which just so happens to be the first thing my manager brings up in every single performance review.

Then, she suggests four different types of multipotentialites, including ways each type can incorporate their interests into their lives. These chapters also have exercises to help us put into action some of what we’ve read. To be honest, I typically ignore exercises like these, but Wapnick’s are both meaningful and doable, and I’ve found myself pulling the book out and working through them. (I’m an Einstein with a touch of Group Hug.)

Finally, Wapnick tells us how to avoid and work through some of the pitfalls multipotentialites face, such as staying focused and not getting discouraged. I love her idea of tracking small wins – something I do in other areas of my life, but never considered doing for my career.

This book certainly opened my eyes. For the first time in a very long time, I’m excited about the possibilities instead of feeling overwhelmed. I may not have all the answers yet, but I feel like I have a path forward. And who knows – maybe someday I’ll reach my full multipotential.

Check out the rest of the Blog Tour stops below, and show your fellow readers some love!

Tuesday, May 2nd: Tina Says…

Wednesday, May 3rd: Jathan & Heather

Friday, May 5th: Sapphire Ng

Tuesday, May 9th: Books & Tea

Wednesday, May 10th: Wining Wife

Thursday, May 11th: WildmooBooks

Monday, May 15th: She’s All Booked

Tuesday, May 16th: Creating My Kaleidoscope

Wednesday, May 17th: Everyone Needs Therapy

Thursday, May 18th: Jathan & Heather

Monday, May 22nd: Brown Dog Solutions

Tuesday, May 23rd: Unabridged Chick

Wednesday, May 24th: Dwell in Possibility

Thursday, May 25th: Becklist

Friday, May 26th: Read Till Dawn

TBD: Literary Quicksand

Huge thanks to TLC Book Tours and HarperOne for the chance to participate in this tour! 

Review: The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

About The Little Book of Hygge

• Kindle Edition: 240 pages
• Published: January 2017 by William Morrow
• Source:
 Library (via Overdrive)

Goodreads DescriptionDenmark is often said to be the happiest country in the world. That’s down to one thing: hygge.

‘Hygge has been translated as everything from the art of creating intimacy to cosiness of the soul to taking pleasure from the presence of soothing things. My personal favourite is cocoa by candlelight…’

You know hygge when you feel it. It is when you are cuddled up on a sofa with a loved one, or sharing comfort food with your closest friends. It is those crisp blue mornings when the light through your window is just right.

Who better than Meik Wiking to be your guide to all things hygge? Meik is CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen and has spent years studying the magic of Danish life. In this beautiful, inspiring book he will help you be more hygge: from picking the right lighting and planning a dinner party through to creating an emergency hygge kit and even how to dress.

Meik Wiking is the CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen. He is committed to finding out what makes people happy and has concluded that hygge is the magic ingredient that makes Danes the happiest nation in the world.

Why The Little Book of Hygge?

Raise your hand if you’ve seen Hygge articles all over the Internet lately.

Yeah, me too.

Of course, I read them, because when you see a word like hygge you automatically want to know what it’s about. And then you read one article and it sounds amazing and you read every one that comes across your plate, and then you see The Little Book of Hygge on your library’s Overdrive page and of course you request it.

At least, that’s what happened to me.

You’ve got me. I requested The Little Book of Hygge partly because I didn’t want to be the only person in the world who didn’t really know what hygge was. Ok, mostly. So I read it, and now I know, and I kinda like the idea, even if I don’t really fully comprehend it.

My Thoughts on The Little Book of Hygge

The Little Book of Hygge is a short little introduction to the Danish way of living. Danes are big on hygge, which doesn’t translate strictly to English but roughly means that feeling you get when you’re sipping coffee wrapped in a fuzzy blanket, wearing a sweatshirt and thick socks, with a puppy on your feet, in front of a roaring fire. Or that same feeling when you’re sitting on a picnic blanket in a summer afternoon, wearing a floppy hat and big sunglasses, eating bread and cheese and drinking wine. Blissful contentment, in other words.

For me, reading The Little Book of Hygge was more about getting an introduction than it was about making life changes, but I do think there’s a bit of applicability in the book. Take the Hygge Manifesto, for example – 10 basic tenents of Hygge. You’ve got Atmosphere (think candles), Presence (living in the moment), Pleasure (this is more about things like chocolate and coffee than anything else), Equality (thinking of others), Gratitude (being thankful), Harmony (again, thinking of others), Comfort (sweaters and socks and baths), Truce (check the drama at the door), Togetherness (be with people you love), and Shelter (have a hygge home).

What’s not to love in all of that?

Blog Tour: Extreme You by Sarah Robb O’Hagan

About Extreme You

• Hardcover: 320 pages
• Published: April 2017 by HarperBusiness
• Source: Publisher via TLC Book Tours

Goodreads Description“Every once in a while, you need someone standing by your shoulder, inspiring you, cheering you on, pushing you to go further. Sarah might be just the coach you’re looking for.”—Seth Godin, author of Linchpin

As a child, Sarah Robb O’Hagan dreamed she could be a champion. Her early efforts failed to reveal a natural superstar, but she refused to settle for average. Through dramatic successes and epic fails, she studied how extraordinary people in sports, entertainment and business set and achieve extremely personal goals. Sarah became an executive at Virgin Atlantic and Nike, and despite being fired twice in her twenties, she went on to become the global president of Gatorade and of Equinox—as well as a wife, mother, and endurance athlete.

In every challenging situation, personal or professional, individuals face the pressure to play it safe and conform to the accepted norms. But doing so comes with heavy costs: passions stifled, talents ignored, and opportunities squelched. The bolder choice is to embrace what Sarah calls Extreme You: to confidently bring all that is distinctive and relevant about yourself to everything you do.

Inspiring, surprising, and practical, Extreme You is her training program for becoming the best version of yourself.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

About Sarah Robb O’Hagan

Sarah Robb O’Hagan is an executive, activist, and entrepreneur, and the founder of Extreme You, a movement to unleash high performance. As the global president of Gatorade, she led its reinvention and turnaround, and she is the former president of Equinox Fitness Clubs. Named one of Forbes’s “Most Powerful Women in Sports” and one of Fast Company’s “Most Creative People in Business,” she has also held leadership positions at Nike and Virgin Atlantic Airways. She is now the CEO of the fitness company Flywheel Sports. A sought-after expert on innovation, brand reinvention, health, fitness, and inspiring human performance, Sarah lives with her family in New York.

Follow Sarah on Twitter, and check out the website for Extreme You.

My Thoughts

 

Extreme You came to me at just the right time. I was feeling uninspired, stuck, and frankly, purposeless. I went into the book with no expectations, and quickly realized it was the book I’d been looking for.

In Extreme You, O’Hagan encourages us to embrace what makes us us, and to develop those skills to the utmost or extreme. She breaks the book down into eight chapters, focusing first on how to identify what sets us apart from others. Then she gives us a little tough love, and a reminder to “Get Over Ourselves” – in other words, to recognize that while we’re awesome, we’re not the world’s gift to xyz. The last half of the book talks about how to translate our gifts into action, and make change.

While there wasn’t anything profound in O’Hagan’s ideas, I appreciated her no-nonsense approach and straight talk. Reading her book is a little like having a conversation with someone – someone who happens to be inside your head anticipating all your excuses and reactions. Her writing is approachable, and as is true with all personal growth books, full of both things I took to heart and things I passed on.

I also enjoyed reading about O’Hagan’s life – the book is made up largely of anecdotes (both hers and those of people she knows). I’d never heard of her, and it’s always fun to me to read about people who’ve made such strides. I admire her for her passion and commitment, and definitely think she’s a role model for women at all stages in their careers. Men too, I suppose!

Like I said, Extreme You came to me when I needed it most. I needed a not-so-subtle reminder that I am worthwhile, that I do have talents to share with the world, and that I’ve been slacking off and letting life happen instead of taking the bull by the horns. For that alone, Extreme You gets my vote.

 

 

Check out the rest of the Blog Tour stops below, and show your fellow readers some love!

Tuesday, April 11th: Jathan & Heather

Wednesday, April 12th: Fearless Creative

Thursday, April 13th: Luxury Reading

Friday, April 14th: Stephany Writes

Monday, April 17th: Good Girl Gone Redneck

Wednesday, April 19th: Wining Wife

Thursday, April 20th: Become a Healthier You

Monday, April 24th: Writing and Running Through Life

Tuesday, April 25th: Everyone Needs Therapy

Wednesday, April 26th: Creating My Kaleidoscope

Thursday, April 27th: Kissin Blue Karen

 

Huge thanks to TLC Book Tours and HarperBusiness for the chance to participate in this tour! 

Review: Spark Joy by Marie Kondo

sparkjoyAbout Spark Joy

• Hardcover: 291 pages
• Published: January 2016 by Ten Speed Press
• Source: Library (via Overdrive)

Goodreads DescriptionMarie Kondo’s unique KonMari Method of tidying up is nothing short of life-changing—and her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, has become a worldwide sensation. In Spark Joy, Kondo presents an in-depth, illustrated manual on how to declutter and organize specific items throughout the house, from kitchen and bathroom items to work-related papers and hobby collections. User-friendly line drawings illustrate Kondo’s patented folding method as it applies to shirts, pants, socks, and jackets, as well as images of properly organized drawers, closets, and cabinets. This book is perfect for anyone who wants a home—and life—that sparks joy.

My Thoughts

I’ll be the first to admit that I was a huge skeptic of everything Marie Kondo said and stands for. I’d heard about her, of course – she was all over the Internet a year or so ago, with her revolutionary tidying technique. I scoffed at the idea that belongings would “spark joy,” and that I didn’t need everything in my house. It sounded a little too, well, touchy-feely for me.

And yet, I was miserable and overwhelmed at the sheer amount of crap in my house. So I read The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up because I figured it was a bestseller for a reason. And, if I’m honest, because I wanted to “be in the know” on this whole revolution thing. I didn’t want to be left behind.

And friends, I had to eat my words.

Kondo’s approach to tidying is – to our Western world – strange. It reeks of emotion, and assigns feelings to things that shouldn’t have feelings. (Like socks.) But, it works. For the first time in my life, I’ve been able to easily identify what I truly want and don’t want to keep, and to let go of things with no regrets whatsoever.

Now, that said, I’m not an expert, and though I KonMari’ed my closet a few months ago, I’m ready to do it again because I didn’t do a good enough job the first time. That’s a story for another time, though. I picked up Spark Joy because I’d read it was the practical guide to tidying – that is, it addressed all those things that didn’t exactly spark joy but that I probably didn’t need to toss. Like toilet paper. And screwdrivers.

If you haven’t read The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, you need to start there. On its own, Spark Joy is a pitiful comparison. But, once you’ve read Magic, Spark Joy does in fact give you a little more information. Is it necessary? No, not at all – in fact, I skimmed most of the book. But, if it’s been a while since you’ve read Magic, you might find that Spark Joy does in fact “spark” you back into action. It’s a good refresher, if you will.

Maybe some day I’ll KonMari my entire house, but for now, my closet is a good enough start. Have you read either of Marie Kondo’s books? What do you think of her methods? Do they work for you, or do you find them too “floofy” to be of much use?

3 stars

Review: Rise: How a House Built a Family by Cara Brookins

riseAbout Rise: How a House Built a Family

• Hardcover: 320 pages
• Published: January 2017 by St. Martin’s Press
• Source: Netgalley

Goodreads DescriptionAfter escaping an abusive marriage, Cara Brookins had four children to provide for and no one to turn to but herself. In desperate need of a home but without the means to buy one, she did something incredible.

Equipped only with YouTube instructional videos, a small bank loan, a mile-wide stubborn streak, Cara built her own house from the foundation up with a work crew made up of her four children.

It would be the hardest thing she had ever done. With no experience nailing together anything bigger than a bookshelf, she and her kids poured concrete, framed the walls and laid bricks for their two story, five bedroom house. She had convinced herself that if they could build a house, they could rebuild their broken family.

This must-read memoir traces one family’s rise from battered victims to stronger, better versions of themselves, all through one extraordinary do-it-yourself project.

My Thoughts

In the span of about 3 days, I saw this book probably 12 times in various newsletters and review blogs. I was intrigued after the first reference, and by the 12th, knew I NEEDED TO READ IT.

Rise: How a House Built a Family is a memoir about a mother and her four children building a house by watching YouTube videos. Cara Brookins and her children (ages 17, 15, 11, and 2) have lived through two abusive marriages. They’ve spent most of their lives afraid and broken. When they finally get out from under the second husband, Brookins proposes the idea of building a house as a way to rebuild their family. After all, they need a place to live, and they need a sense of rebirth. A sense of purpose, something positive and unsullied. Nevermind that they have no experience, no skills, and no idea what they’re getting into.

Screen grab of a video from http://globalnews.ca/news/3179513/how-mother-of-four-who-fled-domestic-violence-built-home-with-youtube-videos/

Screen grab of a video from Global News Canada (click image for story and video)

I was immediately interested, but I was also immediately skeptical. For one thing, I saw the picture of the house. I was convinced they’d just sorta remodeled it, rather than building from the ground up. (Spoiler – I was wrong.)

For another, I was a bit wary of how hyped the book was. Sometimes the idea of a story is better than the story itself, and I was afraid of disappointment. (I’ve never really gotten over Eat, Pray, Love.) I wanted to read Rise, but I also didn’t want to find out I’d been misled by powerful marketing. And finally, I was worried about the writing. I’d never heard of this Cara Brookins person, who, according to Goodreads, is a computer analyst.

I thought about pre-ordering the book, but on a whim checked Netgalley – and there it was.

Before I go on, I’ve seen a couple of other reviews mention that the organization is confusing. It’s not, actually. The chapters alternate between Rise and Fall. “Rise” chapters are the story of the house, and how they built it. “Fall” chapters describe the path leading up to the two bad marriages and the domestic violence. In other words, rise and fall are symbolic, and used to show the breadth of experience. Make sense?

Brookins writes about the past without anger, accounting the years leading up to the house’s conception in a straightforward manner. Yet, it’s not cold or detached. There’s emotion there, but it’s handled in a way that makes you empathize with her.

As for building the house, it quickly becomes clear that Brookins and her kids have bitten off an enormous project. Brookins is up front about that – and writes in a way that makes you laugh and shake your head along with her, all the while cheering her on. She’s able to convey the absurdity of the situation in a way that makes the reader applaud her tenacity, rather than judge her ineptitude. But, to be clear, she’s not inept – not even close. The sheer amount of determination, research, and willingness to just try are critical to her success, both with building the house and healing her family, and with telling her story.

In some ways, Cara Brookins reminds me of Cheryl Strayed (of Wild fame). Both undertake a task they’re incredibly ill-prepared for, that’s way out of their comfort zone, but that will ultimately shape the rest of their lives. However, where Strayed is often bitter and, frankly, clueless, Brookins is optimistic and adaptable. Perhaps the differences are more in the telling than the doing – I suppose we’ll never know.

Rise: How a House Built a Family is definitely not a disappointment; in fact, quite the opposite. I found it interesting, humorous, and most of all, inspiring.

4 stars

Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the review copy! All opinions are my own. 

 

Book Club: Myths of Love by Dr. Ruth

mythsofloveAbout Myths of Love

• Book Club: February 2017 
• Paperback:
160 pages
• Published: June 2014 by Quill Driver Books
• Source: Purchased (Scribd)

Goodreads DescriptionDr. Ruth Westheimer, America’s favorite sex therapist, analyzes ancient myth and its relevance to 21st century relationships in her new book “Myths of Love: Echoes of Greek and Roman Mythology in the Modern Romantic Imagination.” From humanity’s earliest beginnings, people have puzzled over the dual nature of love. For the ancient Greeks and Romans, love was sweet, but it was also irrational, cruel, and often deadly. Faced with the terrible paradox of love, classical civilization produced some of the most psychologically insightful myths of all time—stories of classic archetypes such as Narcissus, Helen of Troy, and Venus and Adonis.

Dr. Ruth and classical scholar Jerome E. Singerman insightfully examine the underlying psychology of the ancient myths and explain why their universal appeal has shaped the imagination of Western civilization for millennia. “Myths of Love” traces how these myths of endured in literature and art across the centuries and how they still influence how we think about sex and relationships today.

Surveying a vast range of Greek and Roman literature from Homer to Ovid, “Myths of Love” retells and reconsiders the full gamut of human sexual experience, from the tenderest expressions of married love to the savage, self-destructive passions of narcissism on jealousy. Bridging high culture and pop culture, “Myths of Love” reveals the secret connections between classic literature and today’s popular novels and films.

A stimulating blend of art, science, ancient religion, and the passions and contradictions of the human heart, “Myths of Love” is a smart and sexy revisit to the roots of Western culture’s eternal fascination with love.

My Thoughts

I’ll keep this brief, since I gave up on the book about a quarter of the way in. That’s rare for me – I usually try to struggle through.

Myths of Love is essentially a book report on Greek and Roman myths. The authors summarize the myth, and then in about 4 sentences, Dr. Ruth gives some “insight” into what it means.

I gave up because I was getting nothing out of it, and because every.single.chapter starts off with some variation of Dr. Ruth saying, “As you know from the myth…” or “You’ll remember from the myth…” No, Dr. Ruth, I don’t remember, I don’t know, I’ve never read the myths so stop assuming I have any idea what you’re talking about.

Basically, Myths of Love seems to be either written for academics, or a pet project of Dr. Ruth’s and Jerome Singerman’s. That’s fine – just not for me.

Book Club Discussion

Our February theme was Love, and we thought this would be an interesting take on it. We also chose a second book with the idea to compare the myths to how modern romances are portrayed today. It was a great idea, in theory. In practice, well…

Only one other member even tried to read the book, and she gave in before I did. As Allison put it, “I expected more from Dr. Ruth.”

1 star