Category Archives: Young Adult

Book Club: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

thehateugiveAbout The Hate U Give

• Book Club: May 2017 
• Hardcover: 
453 pages
• Published: February 2017 by Balzer & Bray
• Source: Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionSixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Why We Picked It

It’s relevant, it’s timely, it’s YA (our May theme), and it’s one of the most talked about books of the year already. And because our Book Club is in-the-know, you know?

My Thoughts

I’m always hesitant to review culturally relevant books, because unless I give them a 5-star rating, inevitably someone gives me the “how do you not think this is the most amazing book ever” reaction. And I get that, I really do – there are books that are well-regarded and well-loved not because they’re necessarily well-written, but because they deal with a theme that’s important or timely or taboo. And the other side of that is true as well – there are books that are loved because they’re well-written, but deal with robots and love triangles and neon-green puppies. In a way, that’s the beauty of books. Reading is a personal experience, and what speaks to one reader may or may not speak to another. Things that drive me crazy will no doubt seem inconsequential to some of you (and vice versa).

With all that said, I’d had several people recommend The Hate U Give as being an excellent book for our times. If you’ve had your ear even just a little bit to the book world, you’ve no doubt heard of it, and heard how wonderful it is. When one of the Book Club girls suggested it for our YA theme, I was more than happy to read it – not because it was something I was particularly interested in, but because I saw the value in reading it.

The Hate U Give is about Starr, a 16-year-old girl who witnesses her childhood friend Khalil being pulled over and eventually shot by a police officer. The book focuses on Starr’s reaction to the situation, as well as the community’s – both black and white. We follow Starr to school, read about her conflicting emotions as she balances her life at home in Garden Heights with the life she’s created at her mostly-white prep school. We watch her family deal with the ever-growing gang presence, compounded by the fact that Garden Heights simply does not have the opportunities more affluent neighborhoods do. And we watch as both sides come to terms with the issues surrounding the question of race and equality.

And here’s where I have to be honest. I didn’t hate The Hate U Give, but I didn’t love it either. I absolutely understand why it’s gotten so much press, and I’m glad for that. But as a book, taken purely on the content and style and form? It lacks so much.

I questioned Starr’s credibility right from the beginning, because her emotions and reactions and thoughts are so inconsistent. One second she’s afraid to speak, the next, she’s telling all who will listen. She talks about loyalty and family and love, and then denies any relation or connection to that very same family. For the majority of the story, she lets other people make decisions for her, seemingly content to be lost in the background.

Before you point out that she’s 16 years old, yes, she is. And yes, she’s just been involved in a horrible, traumatic event, and yes, the world she lives in is vastly different from mine. The issue isn’t so much that she’s not a strong character – it’s that she’s portrayed as one, and written as another.  I was never able to truly care about her, and with a storyline like this one, it’s critical to care about your character.

It’s also entirely too long. I could have lost about 200 pages and still gotten the gist of the story.

Book Club Discussion

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your point of view), we all had similar reactions to the book. None of us hated it, but all of us felt the author missed out on a golden opportunity to really inspire change. The issues raised in The Hate U Give are incredibly important, but unless someone has absolutely no grasp of recent events, they’re issues most of us are already aware exist. In that regard, the book felt a little like a “rage against the machine” kind of approach, though I don’t mean that to say that it’s full of angst and hate. In fact, quite the opposite, as the themes of family and community are actually quite admirable. Simply, had Thomas been able to include solutions, or even attempts at reconciling the issues – or at the very least, beginning to address them – it could have been incredibly valuable in changing the current dialogue. (I realize that’s easier said than done; however, it’s not always enough to simply highlight an issue.)

We talked at length about that, and about how we’d wished we had someone who either disagreed with us or had had a different upbringing. As white, middle-class, college-educated young women, it was incredibly difficult to imagine a world like Starr’s.

Bottom line? The Hate U Give is an important – if not entirely engrossing – read that makes for great discussion. It doesn’t shy away from the truth, but doesn’t assault you with it either. My hope is that as people read it, they begin to recognize some of the more deeply rooted issues in our society, and begin thinking of ways to look at the world a little differently.

June’s Book Club Theme: In a Land Far, Far Away…

June’s Book Club Book: The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald

Review: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg

joyfultroubleAbout Joyful Trouble

• Kindle Edition: 180 pages
• Published: April 2017
• Source: Direct from Author

Goodreads DescriptionA humorous read about an incredible dog and how he had found his true, yet unexpected calling. A dog. A friendship. A purpose.
When a Great Dane arrives in a navy base nobody expects him to win everybody’s hearts, although breaking some rules along the way. But things soon turn sour as somebody threatens to put him to sleep. Who will stand up for this for-legged gentle giant? Tackling universal themes and voicing animal rights and the importance of fighting for what is right.

About Patricia Furstenberg

Patricia Furstenberg writes children stories about real and imaginary dogs and about animals in general. She believes each creature has a story and a voice, if only we stop to listen. He first children’s book Happy Friends, is also available from Amazon. You can read more animal stories and poems on her author website, Alluring Creations.

She is a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition.

My Thoughts on Joyful Trouble

When Patricia reached out to me about reviewing her book, I made it as far in her email as “Joyful Trouble is based on the true story of the only dog….” and knew I was going to read it. (This should come as no surprise if you’ve been here a while.)

Joyful Trouble tells us the story of the Great Dane, Trouble, the only dog to enlist in the Royal Navy during WWII. Everyone loves Trouble, and the enlistment comes about as a way to save him from certain death – you see, Trouble has a tendency to ride the train without a ticket, and the Railway Authorities are none too pleased. The soldiers who come to know Trouble on the train just can’t let this happen.

We learn Trouble’s story by eavesdropping on a Grandfather’s story to his grandchildren. Joyful Trouble is a simple story, and as an adult reader I’d have liked a little more about what Trouble did after enlisting – however, I don’t think that’s necessary for the young audience. If you’re like me and want to know more, here’s Trouble’s – aka, Nuisance’s – Wikipedia page.

This is a quick read that lends itself well to a parent reading to their own children. There’s no fluff here, though – we get Trouble’s story without smoothing over any of the less savory details. However, it’s told well, and we’re left with a warm fuzzy feeling after reading it.

Thanks to author Patricia Furstenberg for the review copy!  

Blog Tour: Blue’s Prophecy by Emily Ross

bluesprophecyAbout Blue’s Prophecy

• Series: The Canis Chronicles (#1)
• Kindle Edition:
 230 pages
• Published: May 2017 by TitleTown Publishing
• Source: Publisher via YA Bound Book Tours

Goodreads DescriptionTwo genetically altered dogs, two different fates. One is Robo, a beloved Great Dane, who is tricked out of the embrace of his human family and then is horribly altered by an evil scientist who rebuilds him with robotic parts, weaponizing the dog for money from the military. But that s not all the scientist does the experiments he conducts leave Robo a genius, almost immortal and with powers beyond explanation. But the horror Robo experiences at the scientist’s hands changes him, driving him insane with the sole mission to destroy all humans, especially those who have tortured and hurt dogs.

Meanwhile, a scrappy alley husky sits in a shelter, when she with her blue eyes and tough wolf-like features captures the attention of another group of scientists desperate to stop Robo from his path of destruction. This dog, called Blue, could be the chosen one to fight and defeat Robo. She is also genetically enhanced and left with glowing turquoise eyes before being released to face Robo’s vicious dog army. Her mission: save human civilization and the packs of dogs she’s grown to love.

About Emily Ross

Emily Ross, 13, is a fifth generation writer and an owner of three dogs, Balta, Buddy and Zoey. Her prose exceeds her years, with Emily starting work on Blue’s Prophecy, a science fiction/fantasy book for pre-teens and teens, when she was 10. Living in Atlanta, Emily is also an animator and a skilled archer, and relaxes by playing the double bass in her middle school orchestra.

WebsiteTwitterFacebook

My Thoughts on Blue’s Prophecy

It’s a well-known fact that any book with a dog on the cover or featuring a dog is going to make it onto my “must-read-now” list. So it’ll come as no surprise that I literally jumped at the chance to participate in the blog tour for Blue’s Prophecy. I mean, look at that cover. Go ahead, look. I’ll wait.

Plus, the idea for Blue’s Prophecy is pretty unique – genetically engineered robot dogs? Yes, please.

The story focuses on Robo, a Great Dane who’s been ripped from his family and turned into a half-robot dog. Robo has, among other “improvements,” a metal leg and implants in his brain and eye that make it possible for him to shoot lasers and speak English. Then there’s Blue, a husky who’s lived on the streets her entire life, and who’s just fine being on her own. Until, that is, she saves a couple of abandoned puppies from one of Robo’s cronies. All of a sudden, Blue finds herself thrust into a fight to save humanity from Robo’s warped sense of justice.

Blue’s Prophecy was so much fun. If you’ve read any of the Survivors books, it’s a similar feel – dogs against the world. I loved the pack dynamics, and the way Blue really grew from a lone wolf to a pack leader. And I’m honestly blown away that this book was written by someone as young as Emily Ross. The only thing that gave her away as a new writer was the story’s timeline – I had a hard time keeping up with where in time things happened. I think that’s an easy fix, solved by simply giving the reader a few “the next day” type markers. I expect we’ll see a little more of that in Emily’s next books, along with a little more backstory for the characters. As a first novel, however, this one is a solid, enjoyable read.

And that cover.

Check out the rest of the Blog Tour stops below, and show your fellow readers some love!

May 8Zerina Blossom’s Books and Reading for the Stars and Moon and 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, & Sissy, Too!  

May 9The Avid Reader  and The Silver Dagger Scriptorium and Crystal’s Chaotic Confessions 

May 10She’s All Booked (that’s me!!) and The Cover Contessa

May 11Adventures thru Wonderland and Books,Dreams,Life

May 12SolaFide Book Club and Diane’s Book Blog

May 15I Read Indie and Shh, I am Reading

May 16: Two Heartbeats

May 17Haddie’s Haven and Booklove

May 18Booker T’s Farm: Books & Nails & Puppy Dog Tales and Lukten av trykksverte, and YA Book Divas

May 19: CBY Book Club and Loves Great Reads

Big thanks to YA Bound Book Tours and TitleTown Publishing for the chance to participate in this tour! 

Review: Zodiac by Romina Russell

zodiacAbout Zodiac 

• Series: Zodiac (#1)
Paperback: 480 pages
• Published: November 2015 by Razorbill
• Source:
 Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionBook 1 in the breathtaking sci-fi space saga inspired by astrology that will stun fans of the Illuminae Files and Starbound series.

At the dawn of time, there were 13 Houses in the Zodiac Galaxy. Now only 12 remain….

Rhoma Grace is a 16-year-old student from House Cancer with an unusual way of reading the stars. While her classmates use measurements to make accurate astrological predictions, Rho can’t solve for ‘x’ to save her life—so instead, she looks up at the night sky and makes up stories.

When a violent blast strikes the moons of Cancer, sending its ocean planet off-kilter and killing thousands of citizens—including its beloved Guardian—Rho is more surprised than anyone when she is named the House’s new leader. But, a true Cancrian who loves her home fiercely and will protect her people no matter what, Rho accepts.

Then, when more Houses fall victim to freak weather catastrophes, Rho starts seeing a pattern in the stars. She suspects Ophiuchus—the exiled 13th Guardian of Zodiac legend—has returned to exact his revenge across the Galaxy. Now Rho—along with Hysan Dax, a young envoy from House Libra, and Mathias, her guide and a member of her Royal Guard—must travel through the Zodiac to warn the other Guardians.

But who will believe anything this young novice says? Whom can Rho trust in a universe defined by differences? And how can she convince twelve worlds to unite as one Zodiac?

Embark on a dazzling journey with ZODIAC, the first novel in an epic sci-fi-meets-high-fantasy series set in a galaxy inspired by the astrological signs.

My Thoughts

In Zodiac, we’re introduced to a galaxy made up of 12 planets, one for each of the constellations in the zodiac. Each planet is different, and the people who live on each planet embody their zodiac’s qualities. Each planet’s guardians serve as political leaders, ensuring the well-being of their planet, their people, and the entire galaxy.

Rho is a 16-year-old girl from Cancer, splitting her time between reading the stars and playing drums in her rock band. When Cancer is suddenly devastated by an asteroid attack and Cancer’s guardian killed, Rho is named as the new guardian despite her young age and complete lack of experience. Rho quickly determines Ophiuchus, the guardian of the fabled 13th house, caused the attack. Unfortunately, the only person who believes her is her best friend – the rest of the galaxy is convinced Ophiuchus is nothing but a children’s story. What follows is roughly 300 pages of Rho traveling across the galaxy trying to convince the rest of the guardians to band together to fight Ophiuchus, all while finding herself falling for two very different boys.

I picked up Zodiac in the bookstore because I was in the mood for a space opera, and the cover immediately caught my eye. Plus, I liked the idea of 12 different planets representing the zodiac. I read about a third of the book in one night – then it languished on my nightstand for about two months, waiting for me to finish it. When I finally picked it back up, I knocked it out in two more nights. Needless to say, it’s a pretty quick read.

That said, while I enjoyed it, I’m not sure I’ll be rushing to pick up the next book in the series. I didn’t actually like Rho a whole lot. Or rather, I didn’t dislike her, but I found her somewhat….useless? There just wasn’t enough action on her part to keep me rooting for her. In some ways, that’s to be expected from a 16-year-old character, and I don’t really fault Russell for that. I think she wrote her well, actually, but YA these days has conditioned us to want more from our main characters. Much of the “doing” is actually done by other characters, and to be perfectly honest, other than Mathias and Hysan, I had a hard time keeping all the secondary characters straight.

Speaking of Mathias and Hysan, have I mentioned how much I hate love triangles? No? Well, I despise them, and I REALLY despise them in YA novels. Thankfully, it’s not too intense in Zodiac, so I was able to ignore it even if I did find it lazy and predictable. I also don’t think the love triangle is *actually* resolved, but I don’t care enough to find out.

Seriously, though – why do YA authors think love triangles are necessary? And why is it always a girl stuck between two boys? Can’t we just have a strong female character who doesn’t need boys? (Feel free to leave me your suggestions – I know there’s gotta be books out there!!)

3 stars

Review: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

peregrinesAbout Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

• Hardcover: 352 pages
• Audio: 9 hours
• Published: June 2011 by Quirk
• Source: Purchased (Scribd Audiobooks)

Goodreads DescriptionA mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of curious photographs.

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

My Thoughts

Another that’d been on my TBR list for ages, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a mystery-slash-fantasy story about a boy who discovers his grandfather was part of a rare group of people who possess magical powers.

Growing up, Jacob’s grandfather Abe told him stories of the orphanage where he grew up, and the kids he called his family. The stories were fantastic – children who could lift impossibly heavy boulders or levitate, who had bees living inside them or mouths in the back of their heads, or who were invisible or could create fire with their bare hands. As a child, Jacob thought these stories were nothing but an old man’s fairy tales, a way to remember the horrors of being a Jew in WWII. Metaphors, if you will.

As it turns out, Abe’s stories were real.

I really enjoyed Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. I didn’t really know what to expect when I started listening – I just knew it’d been something I wanted to read for ages, and Scribd had it as a Scribd Select (meaning it was free to listen). I’d just abandoned two audios for lack of interest, and wanted something easy and fun. Plus, it’d been on my list.

I’m not sure I’d have enjoyed this quite so much had I read it rather than listened to it. Jesse Bernstein is a great narrator, having done the Percy Jackson series and several others. He managed to convey 16-year-old Jacob in a way that wasn’t irritating, but also didn’t portray him as older than he was.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children reminded me in a way of the X-Men stories – mutant children, though they aren’t called mutants, trying to live in a world that persecutes them. What sets Miss Peregrine apart though, is the added time element – without giving too much away, the Peculiars are essentially stuck in time. When Jacob encounters them, his entire worldview is turned upside down, and he begins to see his grandfather in a whole new light.

I did have a couple minor complaints though; I didn’t think things were ever really explained well. For example, there are Hollowgasts and Wights, who are both bad guys, but I’m still not sure what they are or why they’re after Peculiars. And speaking of Peculiars, I have some questions – how do they become Peculiar? Are they born that way? What happens if all the Ymbrynes die? And about a million questions about the loop and everything associated with it, but I’ll keep those to myself because spoilers. Some of those details might have been things I missed because I was listening and my mind wandered, or they might have actually been missing. I wanted to KNOW these things though, and not knowing got a little distracting. In fact, it’s the reason this book only gets 3 stars.

I was pleasantly surprised by this one – I only wish I’d read it sooner!

 

Review: Puppies in the Pantry by Lucy Daniels

puppiespantryAbout Puppies in the Pantry

• Series: Animal Ark (#3)
• Paperback:
 144 pages
• Published: May 1998 by Scholastic
• Source: Gift

Goodreads DescriptionA film crew arrives in town and Mandy looks after some of the animal stars. Then Charley, their Labrador, suddenly disappears. Can Mandy and her friend James find the dog before something terrible happens?

My Thoughts

Guys. PUPPIES IN THE PANTRY. Seriously, just think about that title, look at that cover. And then….think about the fact that there are 70+ books in the series and everysingleone of them has an alliterative title. I’m telling you. Goat in the Garden. Kittens in the Kitchen. Tabby in the Tub. Hedgehogs in the Hall. This is, in fact, a real thing.

So I feel like we need a little backstory.

Back in….oh, October? November? Must have been November. Our book club was looking for a Christmas-themed book, and somehow stumbled upon the Animal Ark books. I want to say someone found Santa Paws, and that led us to Animal Ark (similar books and all). Anyway, we spent a good half an hour laughing hysterically at just the titles. And then, Allison realized she’d bought Puppies in the Pantry at the Scholastic Book Fair once (weren’t those amazing?!) and it got even more awesome. We had such a good time that I ended up giving myself an asthma attack laughing so hard.

We didn’t choose an Animal Ark book that month, but agreed we’d do a book swap for Valentine’s Day. We assigned ourselves a letter so we wouldn’t have to worry about duplicates (I mean, there are 70+ but I guarantee we all would have picked Hamster in a Handbasket or Pony on the Porch). And then, we swapped. I took home Puppies in the Pantry. Of course I was going to read it.

And can I just stop right here and say…..how I wish I’d known these existed as a kid. Nevermind that I was probably too old for them by the time they were published. Psh. They’re awesome. I’d have book-faired the crap out of these.

Puppies in the Pantry features Mandy, our Animal Ark heroine. A film crew comes to town, complete with animal stars, and Mandy’s mom is in charge of making sure the animals are healthy (she’s a vet). Of course, Mandy tags along, and gets to meet the animal stars. Terribly, one day Charley the Labrador goes missing, and it’s up to Mandy to find her!

In case you’re wondering, yes, the title is sorely misleading. This really should be called Lab on the Loose or even Lab on the Lamb. But I suppose neither of those tested well, so Puppies in the Pantry it is. Said puppies in said pantry are an afterthought, and while they do exist, have next to nothing to do with the story.

It’s a little difficult for me to objectively review this book. For one thing, the title. For another, the fact that there are SO MANY BOOKS in this series. For a third, it’s a kid’s book that took me roughly 45 minutes to read.

That said, I loved it, and I fully intend on reading as many more Animal Ark books as I can get my hands on.

3 stars

 

 

Review: Caraval by Stephanie Garber

caravalAbout Caraval

• Series: Caraval (#1)
• Paperback:
 407 pages
• Published: January 2017 by Flatiron Books
• Source: Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionWhatever you’ve heard about Caraval, it doesn’t compare to the reality. It’s more than just a game or a performance. It’s the closest you’ll ever find to magic in this world . . .

Welcome, welcome to Caraval―Stephanie Garber’s sweeping tale of two sisters who escape their ruthless father when they enter the dangerous intrigue of a legendary game.

Scarlett has never left the tiny island where she and her beloved sister, Tella, live with their powerful, and cruel, father. Now Scarlett’s father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval, the far-away, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show, are over.

But this year, Scarlett’s long-dreamt of invitation finally arrives. With the help of a mysterious sailor, Tella whisks Scarlett away to the show. Only, as soon as they arrive, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval’s mastermind organizer, Legend. It turns out that this season’s Caraval revolves around Tella, and whoever finds her first is the winner.

Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is only an elaborate performance. But she nevertheless becomes enmeshed in a game of love, heartbreak, and magic with the other players in the game. And whether Caraval is real or not, she must find Tella before the five nights of the game are over, a dangerous domino effect of consequences is set off, and her sister disappears forever.

My Thoughts

This book was exhausting.

Caraval is the story of two sisters, Scarlett and Donatella (Tella), who live with their abusive father. Scarlett is engaged to a Count she’s never met, but is convinced will save her and Tella from their father. Then there’s Caraval. Caraval is a game, sort of like a scavenger hunt, that’s hosted by a magician named Legend. As a child, Scarlett wanted nothing more for Legend to bring Caraval to her home island so she and Tella could see the spectacle. After 7 years of writing letters, Legend finally responds – with tickets for Scarlett, her fiance, and Tella to come to Caraval to play the game. The only problem is, Scarlett’s wedding is a week away, and if she goes to Caraval she might not get home in time to marry the Count. Of course, Tella thinks going to Caraval will solve all their problems, so she kidnaps Scarlett (with the help of an attractive sailor named Julian) and carts her off to Caraval.

Nothing goes to plan, but long story short, Tella ends up being the treasure Scarlett has to search for during the game, and if she wins, she’ll get a wish – and presumably, her freedom.

I’m so sad to say – this book was just not for me. Perhaps if I’d read it six or seven years ago, I’d have felt differently. But it’s so angsty, so repetitive, and so just plain irritating, that I found myself sighing and rolling my eyes more than enjoying it.

The biggest problem for me was Scarlett – which is pretty key, since she’s the main character and all. For the first 200 or so pages, every third thought she has is either, “I must save my sister,” “I must make it home for my wedding,” or “I can’t share a room with Julian because I must marry the Count.” Around page 200, she gets slightly better – now, every third thought becomes, “I must win the game,” “I must not be afraid,” or “Julian has made me realize I don’t want to marry someone I’ve never met.”

I wish I was exaggerating.

Honestly, the only character I found even remotely tolerable was Julian himself, simply because he basically tells Scarlett to man up and stop being a whiny brat.

What makes it even worse, is that the idea for Caraval was great. Garber did a decent job building the world of Caraval, incorporating just enough magic to make the story, well, magical. There are brief moments where the story takes center stage over the character drama, and that’s what kept me reading. Unfortunately, there are also a lot of elements that don’t really make sense – Scarlett “sees” emotions as colors, but I’m still not sure what the purpose of that is. In a lot of ways, the whole idea of “it’s just a game” doesn’t really work, and that isn’t explained either. For me, these holes (among others) made it difficult to fully buy into the story and the world of Caraval, unlike some of the stronger YA fantasy novels out there.

That said, I did finish the book – and while I don’t heartily recommend it, I do think there’s an audience who will love it. Where I found Scarlett annoying, others might find her loyal and determined. What I saw as a lack of detail, others might see as magical.

Final verdict? It’s a quick read with a gorgeous cover, and with all the hype this one’s getting, worth a shot if this genre is your thing…..but don’t expect to be blown away.

2 stars