dogdishofdoom

Review: Dog Dish of Doom by E.J. Copperman

I know none of you are surprised to see that I read a book with a dog on the cover. If there’s one thing that gets me every.single.time, it’s dogs. I don’t care what the book is about, if there’s a dog in the description or on the cover, I’m going to read it. (Might just take me a while!)

Dog Dish of Doom is the first in a new cozy series from E.J. Copperman (pen name for the writer Jeff Cohen). Copperman/Cohen is no stranger to cozies – from what I can gather, Agent to the Paws is his 4th cozy series. The main character, Kay, is a showbiz agent for animals. Sounds like a fun gig, if we’re honest.

I kinda hated, Kay, truthfully. She annoyed the crap out of me, and I thought she was a bad sleuth. Part of it might have been the fact that she seemed utterly uninterested in solving the murder. Part of it might have been that she was so BAD at what she was trying to figure out. Honestly, I liked her parents more than I liked Kay. I also wanted more Bruno, but that’s kinda beside the point.

Dog Dish of Doom was a relatively short read, but also kind of a boring one. Not much happened, and as I said, there was very little sleuthing. I also got tired of reading the same phrases over and over again.

The more I think about it, the more I want to downgrade my rating to a 2. It’s probably more like 2.5, because I didn’t hate it, but I also have no desire to continue the series.

Series: Agent to the Paws #1    Hardcover: 304 pages

Published: August 2017 by Minotaur Books    Source: Netgalley

Dog Dish of Doom on Goodreads

Cozy fans and animal lovers alike won’t be able to keep their paws off Dog Dish of DoomLaugh-out-loud funny, E.J. Copperman’s series debut is “lots of fun” (Library Journal, starred). 

Kay Powell wants to find that break-out client who will become a star. And she thinks she’s found him: His name is Bruno, and he has to be walked three times a day.

Kay is the Agent to the Paws, representing showbiz clients who aren’t exactly people. In fact: they’re dogs. Bruno’s humans, Trent and Louise, are pains in the you-know-what, and Les McMaster, the famous director mounting a revival of Annie, might not hire Bruno just because he can’t stand them.

This becomes less of an issue when Trent is discovered face down in Bruno’s water dish, with a kitchen knife in his back. Kay’s perfectly fine to let the NYPD handle the murder, but when the whole plot seems to center on Bruno, her protective instincts come into play. You can kill any people you want, but you’d better leave Kay’s clients alone.

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