Review: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg

joyfultroubleAbout Joyful Trouble

• Kindle Edition: 180 pages
• Published: April 2017
• Source: Direct from Author

Goodreads DescriptionA humorous read about an incredible dog and how he had found his true, yet unexpected calling. A dog. A friendship. A purpose.
When a Great Dane arrives in a navy base nobody expects him to win everybody’s hearts, although breaking some rules along the way. But things soon turn sour as somebody threatens to put him to sleep. Who will stand up for this for-legged gentle giant? Tackling universal themes and voicing animal rights and the importance of fighting for what is right.

About Patricia Furstenberg

Patricia Furstenberg writes children stories about real and imaginary dogs and about animals in general. She believes each creature has a story and a voice, if only we stop to listen. He first children’s book Happy Friends, is also available from Amazon. You can read more animal stories and poems on her author website, Alluring Creations.

She is a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition.

My Thoughts on Joyful Trouble

When Patricia reached out to me about reviewing her book, I made it as far in her email as “Joyful Trouble is based on the true story of the only dog….” and knew I was going to read it. (This should come as no surprise if you’ve been here a while.)

Joyful Trouble tells us the story of the Great Dane, Trouble, the only dog to enlist in the Royal Navy during WWII. Everyone loves Trouble, and the enlistment comes about as a way to save him from certain death – you see, Trouble has a tendency to ride the train without a ticket, and the Railway Authorities are none too pleased. The soldiers who come to know Trouble on the train just can’t let this happen.

We learn Trouble’s story by eavesdropping on a Grandfather’s story to his grandchildren. Joyful Trouble is a simple story, and as an adult reader I’d have liked a little more about what Trouble did after enlisting – however, I don’t think that’s necessary for the young audience. If you’re like me and want to know more, here’s Trouble’s – aka, Nuisance’s – Wikipedia page.

This is a quick read that lends itself well to a parent reading to their own children. There’s no fluff here, though – we get Trouble’s story without smoothing over any of the less savory details. However, it’s told well, and we’re left with a warm fuzzy feeling after reading it.

Thanks to author Patricia Furstenberg for the review copy!