Book Bites: What I’m Reading Right Now (June 26, 2017)

bookbitesreadingrightnowWelcome to Book Bites, where you get a glimpse into my reading life! Here I chronicle what I’ve finished (and what you can expect reviews on soon!), what I’m reading right now, and what I’m reading next.

I know, I know. We missed a week last week. I didn’t read a single book, and I thought we’d change it up a little by skipping the “I’m in a slump” post. *grin*

Truthfully, it took me a while to recover from having my heart absolutely shattered by Beartown. Backman does that to me. Needless to say, I’m going to be reading a lot of fluff reads for the next couple of weeks. Which means, I’ll read like 4 books a week. I’m ok with that. (If I ever pick up the pace, that is.)

On the What I’m Reading Right Now front, I’m a little over halfway through Waking Gods, sequel to Sleeping Giants.  I picked up Neil Gaiman’s American Gods to listen to next, since I’m simply not going to get around to reading it in print. (Lots of Gods going on.) And speaking of print, my copy of Gone with the Wind still hasn’t arrived, what’s up with that??

Not much else new in my world – we went to a beer festival, we’re gearing up for the 4th of July, and I’m eagerly counting down the days until we’re back in Mexico. (48, in case you were wondering.)

Last Week’s Posts:

Review: The River of Kings by Taylor Brown

Review: Beartown by Fredrik Backman

How to Choose the Perfect Campsite

I Just Finished:

What I’m Reading Right Now:

 

On Hold for the Moment:

salttothesea difficultwomen strangethedreamer gonewiththewind

Soon I’ll Be Reading:

ensnared theacidwatcher truthwitch        

What are you reading right now? Any must-read books I should add to my list soon?

Missed what I read last week

Linkups

bookdatesundaypoststackingtheshelvesKathryn over at the Book Date hosts It’s Monday! What are you reading! It’s a way to share what you’ve just read, are currently reading, and are reading next.

Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer hosts the weekly meme, The Sunday Post. It’s a chance to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual.

How to Choose the Perfect Campsite

choosetheperfectcampsiteWe’re big campers. Until a few years ago, I’d never camped, but after that first trip I was hooked. Our setup has changed considerably since we first started out, but that’s how it works. The more you camp, the more you learn what you need and don’t need, and what you like and don’t like. For us, having a great site is one of the most important things.

Choosing a campsite can be a tough decision. Your campsite is your home away from home, so you want to be sure you’ve got a good one. Experienced campers likely have it down to a science, but for those of you who are new to camping, here are a few things to take into consideration.

Before You Go

If you’re planning a trip, you can use a site like Recreation.gov or ReserveAmerica to pick your campsite ahead of time. Many campgrounds let you reserve anywhere from 3 days to 6 months in advance. Depending on the campground, sometimes you’ll luck out and the sites will have photos. If not, you can often Google the campground name and pull up pictures that people have shared online. Sometimes those will have site numbers.

That’s not always the case, though. For this reason, we always make a loop at every campground we visit. We take pictures, and sometimes videos, of sites we like. If we ever go back, we just pull up our “campsite” album and compare what’s available to the sites we have pictures of. If you’re going to do that, make sure you get the site number in the photo, as well as the whole site.

campsite

This is one of our favorite campsites. Lots of trees, close to the bathhouse, and a great spot for the dogs. (It’s at the Bandy Creek Campground, for those interested!)

How to Choose the Perfect Campsite

So, just how do you choose the perfect campsite? Everyone is different, but here are the things that we look for when we’re picking out a site. These same guidelines apply whether we’re reserving in advance or showing up last minute, though our choices are typically a lot more limited last minute!

How close are the other campsites?

Simply put, we don’t like being on top of another campsite. We look for one with ample space on either side, as well as no direct lines of sight into other sites.

On the other hand, if we’re camping with a group of friends, we look for sites that are close together – either right next to each other, or across from each other.

campsites for groups

We’ve camped in these sites twice with friends. They’re close together, making it easy to hang out in the evenings!

If we can’t find a site that’s relatively private, sometimes we’ll look for sites that are next to people with RVs. Often, the RVs will block a lot of the sight lines into the neighboring campsites, giving everyone a little space. Of course, you never know what your fellow campers will be like – we’ve had great neighbors and not so great neighbors. Sometimes we luck out and have no neighbors, though that’s rare in summer.

How close is the campsite to the playground/gathering area/store? 

In general, we stay far away from all of the above. Playgrounds and gathering areas tend to be noisy and full of children, especially in summer when the campground is at capacity. While it’s nice to be close the store if you run out of provisions, it’s also easy enough to walk (or drive) over.

campsite near playground

In summer, this campsite would have been terrible for us since it was right next to the playground. In March, with the campground empty, it was perfect!

How close is the campsite to the bath house?

We like to be close, but not *too* close to the bathhouse. Typically, we try to get within 5 or 6 sites. Being right next to the bathroom is noisy and often bright. People traipse to the bathhouse at all hours of the day. It’s nice to have a buffer, but I also don’t like having to hike too far in the middle of the night.

campsite near bathhouse

This is another of our favorite campsites. It’s close to the bathhouse (that building on the far right), has plenty of privacy, and plenty of trees.

If your campground doesn’t have a bathhouse, or you can’t get a site close to it, look for one with lots of trees. Which leads me to my next point….

Does the campsite have plenty of trees?

There are two reasons we look for trees – the dogs, and our hammocks. We create ziplines for the dogs, so we need at least three or four good-sized trees relatively close together. We look for sturdy ones that will support the hammocks (and us!) without bending or breaking.

For our hammocks, we need two tree pairs; sometimes these double as dog trees.

trees at campsite

Sorry about the angle – I was in my own hammock! These trees are perfect for dog lines and hammocks both.

Trees also provide shade, fallen branches to be used as kindling, privacy from other sites, and in a pinch, impromptu toilet facilities.

Where is the campsite’s fire ring?

I can’t tell you how many sites we’ve turned down because the fire ring was precisely centered in the back of the site. We have a huge tent, so we need a site where the fire ring is on one side. This wasn’t quite as much of an issue with our smaller tent.

Remember – you can move a picnic table (generally), but you can’t move a fire ring.

fire ring at campsite

Great location for the fire ring – away from the tent!

There you have it – our tips for choosing the perfect campsite. What other things do you look for in the perfect site? Do you have the same criteria we do?

Happy camping!

Review: Beartown by Fredrik Backman

About Beartownbeartown

Hardcover: 432 pages
Published: April 2017 by Atria
Source:
 Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionThe #1 New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove returns with a dazzling, profound novel about a small town with a big dream—and the price required to make it come true.

People say Beartown is finished. A tiny community nestled deep in the forest, it is slowly losing ground to the ever encroaching trees. But down by the lake stands an old ice rink, built generations ago by the working men who founded this town. And in that ice rink is the reason people in Beartown believe tomorrow will be better than today. Their junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semi-finals, and they actually have a shot at winning. All the hopes and dreams of this place now rest on the shoulders of a handful of teenage boys.

Being responsible for the hopes of an entire town is a heavy burden, and the semi-final match is the catalyst for a violent act that will leave a young girl traumatized and a town in turmoil. Accusations are made and, like ripples on a pond, they travel through all of Beartown, leaving no resident unaffected.

Beartown explores the hopes that bring a small community together, the secrets that tear it apart, and the courage it takes for an individual to go against the grain. In this story of a small forest town, Fredrik Backman has found the entire world.

My Review

I’ll come right out and say it…..there’s way too much talk about hockey Beartown. Both the book and the town, frankly. If Beartown had been written by anyone other than Fredrik Backman, I’d have given up about 25 pages in. There’s THAT MUCH HOCKEY. And too much repetition. But it’s Backman, and I’m a Backman fangirl, so I kept at it. (For evidence of just how much I love Backman, check out my previous reviews of A Man Called Ove, My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry, and And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer.)

Beartown tells the story of a small town’s dreams of being hockey champions. Those dreams rest on the shoulders of the boys’ junior team as they enter the semifinals. Then tragedy occurs, and the town has to deal with the fallout.

I apologize for the spoiler here, though I imagine it’s not too much of a giveaway if you read the book jacket. This book deals with rape.  You can’t read Beartown and not think about the way society responds to rape victims. Whether that was his intent or not, the book has some pretty hefty options for discussion. It’d be a great book club book.

Beartown’s cast of characters is a motley crew of misfits, miserable adults, and misguided teenagers. For me, there’s just something about the way Backman writes his characters. They’re real. They’re awful and they’re beautiful. They’re human. Perhaps that’s it – they represent the many pieces of all of us. No other writer makes me care so much about what happens to his or her characters. Reading a Backman novel is an emotional experience – it’s like meeting someone, falling in love, having your heart broken, and then finding out you really were soulmates and forgiving each other.

In short, it’s a Backman novel through and through. If you’ve read and loved his others, you’ll love Beartown. Likewise, if you hated his others, steer clear….unless you’re mad for hockey. If you’ve never read Backman….start with A Man Called Ove.

Review: The River of Kings by Taylor Brown

About The River of Kingstheriverofkings

Hardcover: 336 pages
Published: March 2017 by St. Martin’s Press
Source:
 Netgalley

Goodreads DescriptionTwo brothers travel a storied river’s past and present in search of the truth about their father’s death in the second novel by the acclaimed author of Fallen Land.

The Altamaha River, Georgia’s “Little Amazon,” has been named one of the 75 “Last Great Places in the World.” Crossed by roads only five times in its 137-mile length, the blackwater river is home to thousand-year-old virgin cypress, descendants of 18th-century Highland warriors, and a motley cast of rare and endangered species. The Altamaha has even been rumored to harbor its own river monster, as well as traces of the most ancient European fort in North America.

Brothers Hunter and Lawton Loggins set off to kayak the river, bearing their father’s ashes toward the sea. Hunter is a college student, Lawton a Navy SEAL on leave; both young men were raised by an angry, enigmatic shrimper who loved the river, and whose death remains a mystery that his sons hope to resolve. As the brothers proceed downriver, their story is interwoven with that of Jacques Le Moyne, an artist who accompanied the 1564 expedition to found a French settlement at the river’s mouth, which began as a search for riches and ended in a bloody confrontation with Spanish conquistadors and native tribes, leaving the fort in ruins and a few survivors fleeing for their lives.

In The River of Kings, SIBA-bestselling author Taylor Brown artfully weaves three narrative strands—the brothers’ journey, their father’s past, and the dramatic history of the river’s earliest people—to evoke a legendary place and its powerful hold on the human imagination.

My Review

The River of Kings is a story about family. About love, about triumph, and about truth. It’s a beautiful story, or rather, set of stories – the book covers three time periods. If you’ve ever read Michener, Brown’s writing reminds me quite a bit of his.

I read this one slowly, only a couple of chapters at a time. The writing is lyrical, but dense. I wanted to read because I enjoyed the style, but had a hard time staying engaged with the story. As often happens with books where the timeline shifts, I’d get engrossed in one story only to be moved to the next. And so on. It wasn’t frustrating, exactly, but made it that much easier to put the book down.

Because of that, or perhaps because of my mood, I ended up listing this one as abandoned. I simply don’t have the dedication to offer The River of Kings at the moment. Maybe I’ll pick it up again. It’s a great book, just not at the right time for me.

3 stars

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

5 Great Audiobooks for National Audiobook Month

audiobookmonthJune is National Audiobook Month

Happy Audiobook Month! For several years now, the Audio Publishers Association has held a national campaign every June to promote audiobook listening. Librarians, booksellers, publishers, and the rest of the reading world come together to celebrate the joys of listening to books. I’ll admit, I’m a little late to the party, since the month is nearly half over. Regardless, I couldn’t miss a chance to join in!

It seems like we’re all over the board when it comes to audiobooks. I know people who would never finish a book if not for audio – and then I know people who consider listening to a book “cheating.” I know people who say they can’t pay attention to the book if they listen to it, and people who find they pick up more listening than reading. And I know plenty of people who have just never tried one!

At one time or another, I’ve been all of those people. I listened to my first audiobook in August 2016. I’d always thought I’d get bored by listening. Plus there was the time factor – I could easily read two or even three books in the time it would take to listen to one. But, I had a trip to Atlanta coming up, and I was driving by myself, and I was bored with all my music. I signed up for a free trial of Scribd, downloaded a book, and off I went. It took me about half an hour to get used to the experience, but by then I was engrossed in the story and knew I was going to finish it. And now here I am, writing a post about audiobooks for Audiobook Month! So without further ado….

5 Great Audiobooks for National Audiobook Month

If You’ve Never Listened to an Audiobook, Try…

theravenboys

Maggie Stiefvater’s The Raven BoysThe first of the series, The Raven Boys is a captivating story by an author who knows how to grab (and keep) your attention. Will Patton’s narration (you may know him from movies like Remember the Titans and Armageddon) is breathtaking, and it’s no wonder he’s won an Audie award for Best Male Narrator. Review in this post.

 

 

 

 

If You Need a Beach-Worthy Audiobook, Try…

bookshoponthecornerJenny Colgan’s The Bookshop on the Corner. It’s a feel-good story for any book lover. Be warned, though, I gave all the characters in the next two books I read Scottish accentsafter listening to Lucy Price-Lewis’ narration. This is a perfect light read with substance, not to mention an excellent travelogue. I’m planning a trip to Scotland now, and I 100% blame this book. You can read my full review here.

 

 

 

 

If You’re Short on Time, Try…

norsemythologyNeil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology. Just over 6 hours in length, and each myth has its own chapter. Unlike a lot of other audiobooks, the chapter endings don’t feel like cliffhangers. That makes Norse Mythology easily digestible, especially if you have limited listening time. And as for narration? Neil Gaiman is superb. Hearing an author read his or her own work is kind of the ultimate experience, since you get to hear it exactly how the author intended. Full review here.

 

 

 

If You Need a Book Club Recommendation, Try…

undergroundrailroadColson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad. It won the National Book Award last year for a reason. It’s timely, compelling, and in-your-face. I listened to this separate from book club, but I wish I knew someone else who’d read it so we could discuss. There’s so much here to talk about, and not just about the past either. Bahni Turpin does the narration, and her ability to convey the emotion and turmoil of the story is remarkable. Full review here.

 

 

 

For Epic Feats of Narration, Try…

sleepinggiantsSylvain Nuevel’s Sleeping GiantsThe audio version features a full-cast recording. The story is told in a series of vignettes – interviews, case files, journal entries, and the like. Having the full-cast recording makes the listening experience that much richer, because you feel like you’re really getting to know each character. Review is coming on this one!

 

 

 

 

How are you celebrating National Audiobook Month? What audiobook should I listen to next? Leave a comment below telling me your favorite recordings!

Not an audiobook listener yet? Use my link to get two free months of Scribd! Rent audiobooks, ebooks, magazines, and more. You’ll get two audiobooks and 6 ebooks during your trial, and if you continue after that, it’s just $9 a month. 

Review: Assault and Pepper by Leslie Budewitz

About Assault and Pepperassaultandpepper

Series: A Spice Shop Mystery (#1)
Kindle Edition: 304 pages
Published: March 2015 by Berkley
Source:
 Purchased

Goodreads DescriptionThe Agatha Award-winning author of Crime Rib is proud to introduce Pepper Reece, the owner of the Seattle Spice Shop who thinks she can handle any kind of salty customer—until a murderer ends up in the mix…

After leaving a dicey marriage and losing a beloved job in a corporate crash, Pepper Reece has found a new zest for life running a busy spice and tea shop in Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Her aromatic creations are the talk of the town, and everyone stops by for a cup of her refreshing spice tea, even other shopkeepers and Market regulars. But when a panhandler named Doc shows up dead on the store’s doorstep, a Seattle Spice Shop cup in his hand, the local gossip gets too hot for Pepper to handle—especially after the police arrest one of Pepper’s staffers, Tory Finch, for murder.

Tory seems to know why she’s a suspect, but she refuses to do anything to curry favor with the cops. Convinced her reticent employee is innocent, Pepper takes it on herself to sniff out some clues. Only, if she’s not careful, Pepper’s nosy ways might make her next on the killer’s list…

My Review

Assault and Pepper is the first book in Leslie Budewitz’s Spice Shop Mystery series. Pepper has recently lost her job, divorced her detective husband, and purchased the Seattle Spice Shop. She’s just starting to get the hang of being a small business owner in downtown Seattle, when one of the area’s local panhandlers dies outside her store. The police quickly deem it murder, and soon arrest one of Pepper’s employees.

If you’re like me and sometimes skip straight to the rating (it’s fine, we all do it), you’ll see this wasn’t a hit for me. For one thing, I felt like I didn’t know Pepper – or any of the other characters – any better at the end of the story than at the beginning. There just wasn’t enough character development. Because of that, I truly didn’t care what happened.

I also didn’t really care about the mystery, because to me the killer was painstakingly obvious. Part of it was the fact that the person was mentioned and then more or less ignored. If you read enough cozies (which I do), that’s a sure sign that’s whodunit. The other part was the method – poisoning requires certain knowledge, and there’s a small number of likely candidates. If you read Assault and Pepper, come back and tell me how long it took you to guess the murderer.

What I did enjoy, though, were all the descriptions of spices. Which is funny, because a lot of reviewers seem to think there was too much spice talk! For me, the lack of character and plot development made the spices the only interesting part of the book.

I ended up skimming the last third or so of Assault and Pepper, but I don’t regret reading it. Cozies are generally quick and light. If you’re a fan of the genre, this one might be worth keeping for a rainy day.

Book Bites: What I’m Reading Right Now (June 12, 2017)

bookbitesreadingrightnowWelcome to Book Bites, where you get a glimpse into my reading life! Here I chronicle what I’ve finished (and what you can expect reviews on soon!), what I’m reading right now, and what I’m reading next.

Big reading week for me! I knocked out 5 books. Ok, so technically I ended up abandoning two of them, but you’ll have to wait for those reviews to find out why. Regardless, I read enough of them to call them read, so we’re counting them.

Beartown and Sleeping Giants were ah-mazing, and I’ll try to get those reviews up soon.

On the What I’m Reading Right Now front, I’ve just started Waking Gods, sequel to Sleeping Giants.  I’m debating about what print book to start next – any suggestions?

I finally feel like I can breathe again, and having a few posts scheduled out makes it easier to write. Does that make sense? Expect a couple of travel-related posts soon! We took Olga hiking this weekend, so I’ll probably do a trail recap too. Our hike was longer than expected – nearly 8 miles! – but she did great. Love having such an active pup, since it forces us to be active too!!

Last Week’s Posts:

Review: Snow Blood Season 4 by Carol McKibben

Review: The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

 

I Just Finished:

 theriverofkings   

 

What I’m Reading Right Now:

On Hold for the Moment:

salttothesea difficultwomen strangethedreamer gonewiththewind

Soon I’ll Be Reading:

ensnared theacidwatcher truthwitch       

What are you reading right now? Any must-read books I should add to my list soon?

Missed what I read last week

Linkups

bookdatesundaypoststackingtheshelvesKathryn over at the Book Date hosts It’s Monday! What are you reading! It’s a way to share what you’ve just read, are currently reading, and are reading next.

Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer hosts the weekly meme, The Sunday Post. It’s a chance to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual.

Review: The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

About The Bear and the Nightingalethebearandthenightingale

Hardcover: 322 pages
Audio: 11 hours
Published: January 2017 by Random House Audio
Source: Purchased (Scribd Audiobooks)

Goodreads DescriptionAt the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn’t mind—she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

After Vasilisa’s mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa’s new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa’s stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed—this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse’s most frightening tales.

My Review

It took me nearly two months to read this, mostly because I didn’t do a whole lot of driving. That said, though, I wasn’t super engrossed in The Bear and the Nightingale, much to my dismay. I was super excited when it came out, and I’ve seen a lot of great reviews for it. More on that in a minute.

The Bear and the Nightingale is more or less a fairytale set in the Russian wilderness. Vasilisa is a young girl who loves the woods – and who can see and interact with the house spirits. Either of those things alone would make her different, but both together make her feared and misunderstood. As the story progresses and the demons come closer, Vasilisa’s gifts become her strengths.

It’s actually a bit difficult for me to describe the story, because truthfully, there’s not much of it. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Where The Bear and the Nightingale shines is in the world-building. Arden brings the Russian wilderness to life in a way few other writers can. Listening to this, I could easily picture the setting, even though I’ve never been to Russia and have certainly never been to Russia in the wilderness in whatever time period this book was set. (I couldn’t figure it out, but assumed it was sometime in the 1600s.)

The Bear and the Nightingale is the kind of book I’m glad I read, simply for it’s beauty and style. The best part of the book was the last hour or so (not sure what that translates to in pages, sorry!). Is it one I’d heartily recommend? Perhaps, if you’re looking for something graceful and atmospheric. If you’re looking for something gripping and thrilling – no.

Review: Snow Blood Season 4 by Carol McKibben

snowbloodseason4About Snow Blood Season 4

• Series: Snow Blood (#4)
• Kindle Edition:
 102 pages
• Published: December 2016 by Troll River Publications
• Source:
 Purchased (Amazon)

Goodreads DescriptionContinuing the paranormal adventures of Brogio, the First Vampire, and his kindred dog, Snow Blood…

Just as Snow Blood secures Nova’s love, a dark stranger in the forest warns of impending danger. The vampire clan is forewarned of new approaching threats. This time two daunting enemies return for blood, threatening both Brogio and his beloved children.

A Kresnick hunter, out for revenge, is dead-set on Brogio’s destruction and places Snow Blood’s pack in the crosshairs. All the while, another familiar force of evil threatens Brogio’s kindred. As the family comes together to strategize ways on how to overcome this new menacing threat, Snow Blood is led to another intriguing path. He discovers a heavenly interest in the continuing evil that haunts his loved ones.

Trying to discover secrets to help in the defeat of the new foes unravels the role of Kane’s friend, Seth. What part does he play in the returning evil? Along the way of these new journeys, he is surprised to discover the white witch’s true nature.

Relentless and merciless enemies plague our favorite vampire family at every turn. Snow Blood again fights to protect all of those he loves against destruction. A dangerous plot to draw out the elusive enemy could save innocent lives, as well as their own. All the while, the future of mankind hangs in the balance.

My Thoughts

I make no secret of that fact that I’ve fallen 100% in love with Carol McKibben’s Snow Blood series. I got a review copy of Snow Blood Season 1 last year (here’s that review), and enjoyed it so much that I purchased Seasons 2 and 3, and then pre-ordered Season 4. Season 4 came out in December, but I totally forgot about it. Two pages in, and I was immediately sorry I’d waited so long to read it.

Snow Blood Season 4 picks up right where Season 3 leaves off, which, since I haven’t reviewed won’t mean much to you. In a nutshell, Snow Blood is a husky-turned-vampire who serves Brogio, the first vampire. Oh, and Snow Blood has his very own vampire wolf-pack. Together with Brogio and his ladylove Selene, Snow Blood and his pack (plus all their friends and progeny) fight evil. Sometimes that evil is ancient Greek gods and goddesses. Actually, most of the time it’s ancient Greek gods and goddesses. In Season 4 there’s even a winged horse.

Believe me, I know. It sound absolutely absurd. I won’t even pretend that’s not the case. But the series is SO.MUCH.FUN. Seriously – I love these books. I’m anxiously awaiting a new installment, and I’ve tried to convince everyone I know to fork over the 99 cents for the first book, because it’s truly just a joy to read. (And hey, if you have Kindle Unlimited it’s free, so READ SNOW BLOOD.) Rarely do I push a book as much as I push these.

Truthfully, Season 4 wasn’t quite as great as the first three, but that didn’t matter in the slightest.

3 stars

Book Bites: What I’m Reading Right Now (June 5, 2017)

bookbitesreadingrightnowWelcome to Book Bites, where you get a glimpse into my reading life! Here I chronicle what I’ve finished (and what you can expect reviews on soon!), what I’m reading right now, and what I’m reading next.

Things are finally starting to somewhat return to normal, and I managed to get over my reading slump thanks to Snow Blood (I’m a huge fan of this totally ridiculous series). I finally finished listening to The Bear and the Nightingale, so that review should be up later this week. Since I slacked off in reading lately, reviews should come a little quicker now, at least until I get a backlog built back up.

I started listening to Sleeping Giants on Friday, and though I’m only about 20 minutes in, I’m already hooked. So excited to get through this one. And, I broke down and ordered a hard copy of Gone with the Wind. Anyone else prefer reading really big books in print?

I’m also working on a few ideas for travel posts, since it’s been a while since we had one of those. Anything in particular you guys want to know about all-inclusive resorts? I’m thinking on a series about how to choose which one to go to, stuff like that….and I still want to do another resort showdown with Royalton Riviera Cancun added in. Time to get writing, huh?!

Last Week’s Posts:

Review: Asking for Truffle by Dorothy St. James

Book Club: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I Just Finished:

thebearandthenightingale 

 

What I’m Reading Right Now:

theriverofkings  

On Hold for the Moment:

salttothesea difficultwomen strangethedreamer gonewiththewind

Soon I’ll Be Reading:

ensnared theacidwatcher truthwitch   

What are you reading right now? Any must-read books I should add to my list soon?

Missed what I read last week

Linkups

bookdatesundaypoststackingtheshelvesKathryn over at the Book Date hosts It’s Monday! What are you reading! It’s a way to share what you’ve just read, are currently reading, and are reading next.

Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer hosts the weekly meme, The Sunday Post. It’s a chance to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual.